Conserving the Nature of America
Report
Rebecca Gómez Chuck Selected as New Project Leader for Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

September 17, 2021

Contact(s):

Dana Bivens, 503-231-6210 or dana_bivens@fws.gov



The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has selected Rebecca Gómez Chuck as the new Project Leader for the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Complex in the Pacific Region.  She will begin her new role in October 2021.

“We are so excited to have Rebecca as the new Project Leader for the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Complex,” said Robyn Thorson, Regional Director.  “Her 30 years of experience with the National Wildlife Refuge System combined with her passion for public lands, conservation, and community make her an ideal candidate for this position.”

Chuck began her career with the Service in 1991 as a volunteer at Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge where she helped conduct wildlife surveys while finishing her degree in Wildlife Management at Humboldt State University.  In 1995, she began working as a Refuge Operations Specialist at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge where she served as the water rights specialist, coordinated the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, and participated in all aspects of refuge management.  In 2002, Chuck was selected as the Deputy Project Leader for the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex and has spent the past 19 years working to protect this vital habitat. 

As the project leader for Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Chuck will lead a team in the management of both Tualatin River and Wapato Lake National Wildlife Refuges.  Located on the outskirts of Portland, Oregon, these urban refuges provide wildlife viewing, hiking, hunting, and other recreational opportunities close to a city center.

"I was so fortunate to be introduced to nature at a young age even though I lived in an urban area,” said Chuck. “It changed my life. I am looking forward to sharing my love of the outdoors and conservation with the community and helping to engage the next generation of conservation enthusiasts.”

The National Wildlife Refuge System is a network of protected lands that are established for the conservation of wildlife and habitats.  These lands also offer the public access to wildlife-dependent recreational activities such as hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, photography, environmental education, and interpretation. 

For more information on the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, please visit: https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Tualatin_River/ and  https://www.fws.gov/refuge/wapato_lake/

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information, visit www.fws.gov/pacific, or connect with us through facebook.com/USFWSPacific, twitter.com/USFWSPacific/, tumblr.com/blog/usfwspacific, flickr.com/photos/usfwspacific/ and youtube.com/user/USFWS


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.