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Conserving the Nature of America
Principal Deputy Director Margaret Everson and Iowa Department of Natural Resources Director Kayla Lyon work with kids in a class room lab at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge.
Principal Deputy Director Margaret Everson and Iowa Department of Natural Resources Director Kayla Lyon work with kids at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa. Credit: Melissa A. Clark/USFWS

Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge Celebrates Expansion of Hunting and Fishing Access

October 11, 2019

As the nation heads into National Wildlife Refuge Week, Principal Deputy Director Margaret Everson welcomed members of the conservation community to Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was highlighting work to expand hunting and fishing opportunities and make it easier for all Americans to access their public lands.

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Close shot of Monarch butterfly on blazing star.

Monarch butterfly on blazing star. Credit: Photo courtesy of Brett Whaley/Creative Commons

How Saving One Butterfly Could Help Save the Prairie

October 10, 2019

The monarch is more than one butterfly. Think of it as an ambassador to a mosaic of prairie plants and animals that all need soil, sun and time to grow. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been making a home for monarchs and species of the wider prairie ecosystem for decades, improving overall prairie health.

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Learn More About Monarchs »

Close shot of A Kirtland's warbler perched on the end of pine tree branch.

A Kirtland's warbler on a tree branch. Credit: Vince Cavalieri/USFWS

Partners Celebrate Successful Recovery of Beloved Kirtland's Warbler

October 08, 2019

Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland's warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Decades of effort by dedicated partners have increased the chances of a sighting, and due to the species' remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the bird no longer warrants Endangered Species Act protection.

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