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Conserving the Nature of America
Brian Hamlin, a forensics scientist at the Service’s Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon, uses a drill to extract DNA samples from a set of antlers from a bull elk that was killed in Crater Lake National Park.
Brian Hamlin, a forensics scientist at the Service’s Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon, uses a drill to extract DNA samples from a set of antlers from a bull elk that was killed in Crater Lake National Park. Credit: Kathy Spengler/USFWS

Teamwork Brings Down Serial Poacher

April 08, 2021

To catch a serial poacher at Crater Lake National Park in Oregon, it was going to take teamwork and dedication. Finally, after years of persistence and top-flight forensics work, the team used the evidence to develop the portrait of a poacher who was killing deer and elk within the park. With that evidence, the U.S. Department of Justice was able to secure a guilty plea to a Lacey Act violation for illegally poaching a trophy bull elk from the park.

Portrait of a Poacher »


People on stage setting behind table ready to present.
New human rights and conservation curriculum in Cameroon aims to educate conservation practitioners on the importance of protecting human rights. Credit: Vincent Zoalang, Garoua Wildlife College

U.S. Government Launches Human Rights and Conservation Curriculum for Central Africa

April 01, 2021

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Agency for International Development have launched a new human rights and conservation curriculum at Garoua Wildlife College in Cameroon. This technical and college-level curriculum reflects the growing concern in Central Africa that for conservation efforts in protected areas to be successful, they must reflect the interests and needs of indigenous communities.

News Release »

Wildlife Inspector Camille Sims in lab.
Wildlife Inspector Camille Sims. Credit: USFWS

Women Help Create Wildlife Law Enforcement Successes

March 31, 2021

During National Women’s History Month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service celebrates the women in our Office of Law Enforcement who do undercover and covert work, perform inspections and excel at public outreach, science and technology innovations, and intelligence gathering. Women represent the Service through our attachés, work as information technology and help desk specialists, ensure our seized items are properly logged and secured, and provide administrative support.

Be Prepared to Be Inspired »