Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

What's going on at FWS

With more than 560 National Wildlife Refuges, 70 national fish hatcheries, numerous regional and field offices across the country and thousands of active conservation projects, our 8,400+ employees of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have a lot going on. Here are a few of the latest news stories from across the Service...

5 spread-out people in lush area
Habitat Restoration
Bipartisan Infrastructure Law: 2022 Annual Report
At its core, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is a significant investment in the nation’s infrastructure and economic competitiveness. For the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the funding will build on proven projects, programs and partnerships that protect our cherished wildlife and natural...
A green hummingbird with white chest and red throat perches at red feeder
Nature out your window
You don’t need to go far, or even outside, to discover nature and its mental health benefits. The nearest window can reveal plants and animals going about their business undisturbed and free for the viewing. 
a grey and brown bird resting on a small branch
Endangered Species Act
Five species on San Clemente Island declared fully recovered
Decades of collaborative conservation efforts on U.S. Navy-owned San Clemente Island resulted in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s announcement today that five species – San Clemente Island paintbrush, lotus, larkspur and bush-mallow plants and San Clemente Bell’s sparrow have fully recovered...
Male wood duck sitting on teal-green water with ripples, facing right with an orange bill, green head and rusty chest
Get Involved
Where Art and Science Meet
Growing up I always doodled. I scribbled on everything and everything I could get my hands on (even things I shouldn’t, like my bedroom walls). It was how I was able to express myself and share the world through my eyes.
Female fenders blue butterfly on a small pink flower. Wings are spread out and you can see the brownish blue color on top with an outline of white on the wings.
Endangered Species Act
Partnership-Driven Conservation Gives Oregon Butterfly Wings
PORTLAND, Ore. – The Fender’s blue butterfly, once thought to be extinct, is fluttering toward recovery under the Endangered Species Act. Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reclassified Fender’s blue butterfly from endangered to threatened and finalized a special rule that makes it easier...
Highland Dam Removal Site on the West Fork River in West Virginia
Habitat Restoration
Fish show up after infrastructure 'glow-up'
Across the country, people are transforming and replenishing the landscape—creating new opportunities to connect with nature, improving safety around waterways, and opening river access to aquatic species.

Our Focus

The history of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can be traced back to 1871. We are the only federal government agency whose primary responsibility is to manage fish and wildlife resources in the public trust for people today and future generations. Here are just a few of our focus areas...

What We Do For You

If you’re looking for places to experience nature; interested in partnering with us; seeking technical advice, permits, grants, data or scientific research; want to know more about today’s conservation challenges; looking for ways on how you can get involved and make a difference -- the Service has a lot to offer and more…

Visit Us - Our Locations

With more than 560 national wildlife refuges, dozens of national fish hatcheries and more than 100 field offices, there are numerous great U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service locations to visit.