Moapa coriacea

Moapa Dace

FWS Focus

Overview

Characteristics
Overview

Moapa dace is an endangered species endemic to Muddy (Moapa) River and associated thermal spring systems within the Warm Springs area of Clark County, Nevada.

Scientific Name

Moapa coriacea
Common Name
Moapa dace
FWS Category
Fishes
Kingdom

Location in Taxonomic Tree

Genus
Species

Identification Numbers

TSN:

Characteristics

Characteristic category

Food

Characteristics
Food

Moapa dace occupy a variety of habitats in the Warm Springs area, including spring pools, tributaries (spring outflows), and the main stem Muddy River. Juveniles prefer tributaries and habitats with increasing flow velocities as they grow. Adults prefer both tributaries and the main stem Muddy River, with the largest adults occurring in the river.The Moapa dace prefers habitat within local headwaters where water temperatures are between 82.4 to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit and turbidity is low. It is known to occur in springs pools, spring feeders, small outflow streams, and the main river channel. A slight current exists in most areas inhabited by the species. Native waters for this unique fish are noted to be clear, with variable bottom types in pool habitats and may be spring deposited gravels or flocculent organic/silt. In outflow streams the bottoms may be of sand, gravel, pebbles and cobbles, or mud.

Characteristic category

Lifecycle

Characteristics
Reproduction

This species is endemic to Muddy (Moapa) River and associated thermal spring systems within the Warm Springs area of Clark County, Nevada. The Warm Springs area encompasses ten thermal spring provinces, which form the headwaters of the Muddy River. Moapa dace likely inhabited 25 springs and approximately 9.9 miles of the upper Muddy River (Ono et al. 1983). Historically the Muddy River was 30 miles long, however in 1935, with the completion of the Hoover Dam, Lake Mead flooded the lower 4.9 miles of the river, rendering it unsuitable for Moapa dace. Recent investigations found adult Moapa dace occurring in low numbers in restricted portions of three springs and less than 2 miles of spring outflow and river in the Warm Springs area (USFWS 1983).

Lifespan

Moapa dace can live for 4 or more years.

Characteristic category

Physical Characteristics

Characteristics
Size & Shape

Moapa dace can grow up to 4.7 inches long.

Characteristic category

Habitat

Characteristics
Habitat

Moapa dace occupy a variety of habitats in the Warm Springs area, including spring pools, tributaries (spring outflows), and the main stem Muddy River. Juveniles prefer tributaries and habitats with increasing flow velocities as they grow. Adults prefer both tributaries and the main stem Muddy River, with the largest adults occurring in the river.The Moapa dace prefers habitat within local headwaters where water temperatures are between 82.4 to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit and turbidity is low. It is known to occur in springs pools, spring feeders, small outflow streams, and the main river channel. A slight current exists in most areas inhabited by the species. Native waters for this unique fish are noted to be clear, with variable bottom types in pool habitats and may be spring deposited gravels or flocculent organic/silt. In outflow streams the bottoms may be of sand, gravel, pebbles and cobbles, or mud.

River or Stream

Geography

Characteristics
Range

This species is endemic to Muddy (Moapa) River and associated thermal spring systems within the Warm Springs area of Clark County, Nevada. The Warm Springs area encompasses ten thermal spring provinces, which form the headwaters of the Muddy River. Moapa dace likely inhabited 25 springs and approximately 16 km of the upper Muddy River (Ono et al. 1983). Historically the Muddy River was 30 miles long, however in 1935, with the completion of the Hoover Dam, Lake Mead flooded the lower 8 km of the river, rendering it unsuitable for Moapa dace. Recent investigations found adult Moapa dace occurring in low numbers in restricted portions of 3 springs and less than 2 miles of spring outflow and river in the Warm Springs area (USFWS 1983).

Launch Interactive Map

Timeline

Explore the information available for this taxon's timeline. You can select an event on the timeline to view more information, or cycle through the content available in the carousel below.

4 Items