Features

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Birds of the Rainwater Basin

Pintail ducks are just one of the bird species you can see at Rainwater Basin. Click on the link for full list.

Rainwater Basin WMD Bird list 2011 (116 KB PDF)

Items of Interest

Hours of Operation

Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District Office is open Monday - Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM except for Federal Holidays. Waterfowl Production Areas are open sunrise to sunset. Please feel free to call us with questions at 308-263-3000.

Watching for Whoopers

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It's that time of year to be Watching for Whoopers and report your sighting to the Nebraska Game and Parks (402-471-0641), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (ES) (308-379-5562), or The Crane Trust’s Whooper Watch hotline (1-888-399-2824). Emails may be submitted to joel.jorgensen@nebraska.gov. If you have any other questions, please contact Jeff Drahota at our Rainwater Basin WMD office at 308-263-3000.

Report Crimes against Wildlife

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As hunting increases this fall, a slim few may feel tempted to conduct themselves in unsportsmanlike behavior. If you see anything that violates the law on federal lands, you may call 1-844-NWR-TIPS (697-8477) or email NWR_TIPs@fws.gov 24 hours a day. You'll be asked for the type of incident as well as the date, place (refuge name or county/state) and approximate time of the incident. You may leave your name and contact information, which will aid law enforcement in the response and investigation, or you may remain anonymous. Any contact information provided will be used for official purposes only. Violations may also be reported to the Nebraska Game and Parks' Wildlife Crimestoppers line at 1-800-742-7627.

Law Enforcement
District's Vision

Vision for the District

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The Rainwater Basin provides critical habitat for millions of migratory birds. The basin’s name reflects both the basis of its wetland hydrology and natural precipitation cycles. A network of functioning wetland and prairie plant ecosystems provides a native grassland mosaic that gives the local community a sense of pride and connection to the Great Plains flora and fauna. The lands managed by the wetland management district serve as an example of land stewardship mimicking natural processes, and they provide an array of wildlife-dependent educational and recreational opportunities. It is only through partnerships with individuals, agencies, and organizations that this vision can be achieved and maintained.

Endangered Species

Endangered Species

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The Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District plays a vital role in the restoration and preservation of essential migration habitat that supports approximately 300 remaining wild Whooping Cranes during their spring and fall migrations.

Whooping Crane Profile

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS