Shutdown Notice
Due to the lapse in federal appropriations, this website will not be updated until further notice. Where public access to refuge lands does not require the presence of a federal employee or contractor, activities on refuge lands will be allowed to continue on the same terms as before the appropriations lapse. Any entry onto Refuge System property during this period of federal government shutdown is at the visitor's sole risk. Please read this important updated message about the closure of National Wildlife Refuge System facilities during the shutdown, and refer to alerts posted on individual refuge websites for the status of visitor facilities and previously scheduled events that may still occur during the shutdown.

For more information, please visit the Department of Interior webpage at https://www.doi.gov/shutdown

Features

  • White Pelicans / USFWS

    Life on the Salt

    The salt flats may be devoid of vegetation but they are rich in wildlife. While some birds nest here, others feed on salt brine flies.

    Wildlife & Habitat

  • Hourglass selenite crystal / John Betts ©

    Unique to the Refuge

    Selenite crystals can grow the length of a pencil and weigh up to 38 pounds. Dig deep and find one!

    Digging for Crystals

  • Presentation for students / USFWS

    Enjoy, Explore, Learn

    Educators – bring your indoor classroom outside. The refuge is a great place to learn about science, math, art, history and more.

  • Turtle floating / Jenny and Oliver Davis ©

    For Wildlife & You

    National Wildlife Refuges are managed for wildlife and habitat and to ensure future generations will always have wild places to explore!

    Visitor Activities

News
Featured Stories

History of Conservation

President Theodore Roosevelt 150 x 115

In 1903 President Theodore Roosevelt established the Pelican Island Bird Reservation, the first of 53 federal reserves he would create during his time in office and the roots of what is today known as the National Wildlife Refuge System. The 26th president was a dedicated naturalist throughout his life and is considered by many to have been the country’s “Conservationist President.”

History of the Refuge System

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS