Green Your Own World: 

  • Plant native grasses, trees, and shrubs that absorb carbon dioxide. Native plants support wildlife like migratory birds and pollinators. They require less water and upkeep since they evolved to thrive in local conditions. They can also reduce water use, pesticide use, and more. 

  • Slow the spread of invasive species: remove  invasive species invasive species
    An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

    Learn more about invasive species
    , stop the spread, learn more about them, and support native wildlife. 

  • Plant a pollinator garden in your local community – even your yard, balcony, or windowsill. Pollinator gardens provide nectar and pollen for pollinators such as butterflies, hummingbirds, beetles and bees. 

  • Apply for tax credits and rebates to install solar panels and other renewable energy sources. Each state has its own set of policies and incentives that can help homeowners transition to solar energy. For current information on incentives, including incentive-specific contact information, visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency website or contact your current energy provider to ask about renewable energy options available to you. 

  • Restore degraded land and remove invasive plants and weeds to support healthy, native habitats, such as grasslands, and conserve interconnected natural areas to help wildlife migrate. Landowners can voluntarily in various programs like the Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program or USDA’s conservation programs that provide benefits and support to improve and protect their natural environment while keeping working lands working. 

Quick Everyday Actions

There are small things we can all do to reduce our environmental impact: 

  • Reduce, reuse, recycle - rethink what you’re purchasing and why 

  • Purchase recycled or upcycled products when possible 

  • Use re-usable bags and water bottles 

  • Turn off our electronics and HVAC systems when not in use 

  • Be mindful of water use 

  • Replace lightbulbs and older appliances with energy-efficient models (including smaller appliances like toasters and microwaves, not just stoves and refrigerators). Ask your local government, energy provider, or state government whether they have resources, rebate, or incentives. For instance, you might be eligible for a free or cheap energy audit that can save you energy and money! 

Volunteer: 

  • Support a national wildlife refuge, national fish hatchery or other public lands and natural spaces in your community. For instance, you can help on a clean-up or a habitat restoration project. 

  • Sign up to be a citizen scientist. Encourage your family and friends to join you. Opportunities abound – like the National Phenology Network Nature’s Notebook project - where you can become part of nationwide efforts to gather data on plants and wildlife that researchers can use to better understand changes in the environment. 

  • Explore your local community: identify natural spaces that need to be restored or protected, advocate for pedestrian and bicycle access along roads, volunteer your time to keep green spaces green, or find other ways to get involved. 

  • Volunteer at local shelters, donate water, clothes, food, and other necessities that the shelter needs. As  climate change climate change
    Climate change includes both global warming driven by human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns. Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century humans have had an unprecedented impact on Earth's…

    Learn more about climate change
    amplifies severe weather, our most vulnerable populations will be exposed to dangerous conditions like heat waves and severe storms.  

  • Join a local conservation group, a USFWS Refuge Friends Group, or recreation enthusiast group like a birding club, to get outside and learn more about your local ecosystem.  

Learn and Engage: 

  • Teach the next generation about the importance of nature by taking them outside. Your yard or a nearby green space is one place to start, or plan a visit to a national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
    A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

    Learn more about national wildlife refuge
    , national fish hatchery or other federal, state or local public lands. 

  • Learn about the Mano Project's U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Civilian Climate Corp (CCC) and other initiatives dedicated to addressing climate change. Explore career options within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  • Talk to your neighbors, civic associations, local service groups and others to engage them in discussions and action. 

  • At the local, county and state level, stay informed and learn how to support safe infrastructure that benefits people and wildlife (like walking bridges, underpasses, bicycle lanes, and public transportation), more green and open spaces, improvements to existing natural spaces, and more.  

  • Remain civically engaged in local, state, and federal government – share your voice and perspectives with elected officials based on the best available science.  

  • Stay informed about climate change, how people, companies, and countries can respond to it, and ways to get involved. Learn what companies, governments, and non-profits are doing to address climate change. As a consumer and member of society, your actions matter, and you can influence response to climate action in the public and private sectors.

  • NASA, NOAA, and the EPA have vast libraries of resources to learn about climate change and how the world can respond to slow or stop its effects.

Read about how communities are working together to respond to climate change climate change
Climate change includes both global warming driven by human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns. Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century humans have had an unprecedented impact on Earth's…

Learn more about climate change
: