General Information

This booklet is an informative summary of the 2022 Alaska subsistence spring/summer migratory bird harvest regulations contained in Title 50 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 92. There may be errors or omissions that have not been identified and regulatory changes that occur after printing. This booklet is intended as an informational guide only. To be certain of current regulations, refer to the official CFR, https://www. ecfr.gov/, and the Federal Register publications available at the website https://www.federalregister.gov/

Effective upon publication of the Final Rule in the Federal Register, these regulations apply to the spring and summer subsistence harvest of migratory birds in Alaska, April 2 through August 31, 2022. The Council reviews and recommends needed modifications to these regulations annually.

Migratory bird hunting from September 1, 2022 through March 10, 2023 is managed under separate Federal regulations in Title 50 CFR Part 20 and State regulations in 5 AAC 85.065.

Who is Eligible to Participate?

If you are a permanent resident (see definition pg. 31) of a village within an included subsistence harvest area, you are eligible to harvest migratory birds and eggs for subsistence purposes.

Included Areas/Villages

Village areas located within the Alaska Peninsula/Bristol Bay, Kodiak Archipelago, the Aleutian Islands, or areas north and west of the Alaska Range are subsistence harvest areas. Additional included communities added by petition are: Gulkana, Gakona, Tazlina, Copper Center, Mentasta Lake, Chitina, Chistochina, Tatitlek, Chenega, Port Graham, Nanwalek, Tyonek, Hoonah, Craig, Hydaburg, Yakutat, and Cordova.

Excluded Areas

Excluded areas are not subsistence harvest areas and are closed to harvest, with the exception of any portion of an excluded area that falls within a harvest area that has been designated for a specific community (see Region-Specific Regulations sections). Residents of excluded areas are not eligible to participate in the spring and summer subsistence harvest of migratory birds and their eggs. Geographic descriptions of the six excluded areas follow.

  1. Central Interior Excluded Area: Fairbanks North Star Borough and that portion of Unit 20(A) east of the Wood River drainage and south of Rex Trail, including the upper Wood River drainage south of its confluence with Chicken Creek; that portion of Unit 20(C) east of Denali National Park north to Rock Creek and east to Unit 20(A); and that portion ofUnit 20(D) west of the Tanana River between its confluence with the Johnson and Delta Rivers, west of the east bank of the Johnson River, and north and west of the Volkmar drainage, including the Goodpaster River drainage. The following communities are within the Central Interior Excluded Area: Delta Junction/Big Delta/Fort Greely, McKinley Park/ Village, Healy, Ferry, and all residents of the formerly named Fairbanks North Star Borough Excluded Area.
  2. Municipality of Anchorage
  3. Matanuska-Susitna Borough.
  4. Kenai Peninsula roaded area: Game Management Unit (Unit) 7, Unit 15(A), Unit 15(B), and that portion of Unit 15(C) east and north of a line beginning at the northern boundary of Unit 15(C) and mouth of the Kasilof River at 60° 23’ 19” N; 151° 18’ 37” W, extending south along the coastline of Cook Inlet to Bluff Point (59° 40’ 00” N), then south alonglongitude line 151° 41’ 48” W to latitude 59° 35’ 56” N, then east to the tip of Homer Spit (excluding any land of the Homer Spit), then northeast to the north bank of Fox River (59° 48’ 57” N; 150° 58’ 44” W), and then east to the eastern boundary of Unit 15(C) at 150° 19’ 59” W.
  5. Gulf of Alaska roaded area: Incorporated city boundaries of Valdez and Whittier, Alaska.
  6. Southeast Alaska: Sealaska regional corporation boundary defined in Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA).

 

 

Anyone can petition the Council to change a community’s exclusion/ inclusion status. The petition must address how the area does or does not meet the qualifying criteria for inclusion or exclusion. Upon receipt, the Council will seek regional input and submit a recommendation to the Service Regulations Committee to consider including or excluding the community from the subsistence harvest.

Participation by Permanent Residents of Excluded Areas

Immediate family members who are residents of excluded areas may participate in the customary spring and summer subsistence harvest in a community’s subsistence area with permission of the Village or Tribal council, whichever is appropriate, to assist indigenous inhabitants in meeting their nutritional and other essential needs or for the teaching of cultural knowledge. A letter of invitation will be sent by the Village or Tribal council to the hunter with a copy to the Executive Director of the

Co-management Council. In the Upper Copper River region, an invitation permit may be issued from the Tribal Council to the hunter with a copy to the Executive Director of the Co-management Council as an alternative to the letter of invitation.

Special Requirements for National Parks and Preserves

Subsistence use on National Park Service areas is restricted to only those national monuments, parks, and preserves open to subsistence. Glacier Bay National Park, Katmai National Park, Kenai Fjords National Park, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, “old” McKinley National Park and Sitka National Historical Park are closed to subsistence. National Park Service regulations govern which communities or individual residents qualify to subsistence harvest for specific National Parksand Monuments (50 CFR Part 13, Subparts A, B, and C). For more information about National Park Service areas contact: National Park Service, 240 West 5th Ave., Room 114, Anchorage, AK 99501, (907) 644-3509.

Use and Possession of Migratory Birds

You may not sell, offer for sale, purchase, or offer to purchase migratory birds, their parts, or their eggs taken under these regulations, except as provided in this section.

  1. Giving and receiving migratory birds. Under these regulations, you may take migratory birds for human consumption only. Harvest and possession of migratory birds must be conducted using nonwasteful taking. Edible meat of migratory birds may be given to immediate family members by eligible persons. Inedible byproducts of migratory birds taken for food may be used for other purposes, except that taxidermy is prohibited, and these byproducts may only be given to other eligible persons or Alaska Natives.
  2. Authentic native articles of handicraft or clothing (see page 34).

 

Required Licenses and Stamp

  • Federal Duck Stamps are not required to participate in this harvest.
  • Waterfowl hunters 18 years or older are required to have a State hunting license and State Duck
  • Stamp, except disabled veterans, those 60 years or older, and those that qualify for a low-income license.
  • State stamps and hunting licenses are available from State license vendors, ADF&G offices or online at: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/ store/
  • State Duck Stamps must be signed in ink across the face and must be carried at all times while hunting waterfowl.

 

Shooting Hours

The harvest is open 24-hours per day.

Seasonal Closures

Seasonal closures apply to both bird and egg harvest in Alaska, unless specified otherwise.

Prohibited Harvest Methods and Means

You may not use the following devices and methods to harvest migratory birds:

  • Swivel guns, shotguns larger than 10 gauge; punt, battery or machine guns, fish hooks, poisons, drugs, explosives, or stupefying substances.
  • Shooting from a sinkbox or low-floating device that conceals the hunter beneath the surface of the water.
  • Hunting from any type of aircraft.
  • Hunting with the aid of recorded bird calls.
  • Using live birds as decoys, except for auklets on Diomede and St. Lawrence Islands.
  • Using any vehicle, aircraft, or boat to concentrate, drive, rally, or stir up any migratory birds; however, boats may be used to position a hunter.
  • Possession or use of lead or other toxic shot while hunting.
  • Shooting from or across any road or highway.
  • Using an air boat (Interior and Bristol Bay Regions only) or jet ski (Interior Region only) for hunting or transporting hunters.
  • Using private or chartered aircraft for hunting or transporting hunters, except for transportation between public airstrips (Yukon/ Kuskokwim Delta Region only).
  • Hunting with the aid of baiting, or over any baited area, where a person knows or reasonably should know that the area has been baited.
  • Hunting from motorized vehicles or any form of watercraft (Prince William Sound Area East in Gulf of Alaska Region only).

 

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Region-Specific Regulations

(OpenSeasons)

Northwest Arctic Region

Seasons:

  • April 2–June 14, July 16–August 31 (hunting – in general).
  • April 2–June 14 (waterfowl egg gathering).
  • May 20–July 12 (seabird egg gathering).
  • July 1–July 15 (hunting molting/non-nesting waterfowl).
  • Closure: June 15–July 15, except for the taking of seabird eggs and molting/non-nesting waterfowl as described above.

 

Emperor Goose – no egg gathering is permitted.

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Gulf of Alaska Region

Prince William Sound - West

Harvest area: GMU 6(D).

Eligible communities: Chenega Bay and Tatitlek

  • Season: April 2–May 31 and July 1–August 31.
  • Closure: June 1–June 30.

 

Kachemak Bay Area

Harvest area: that portion of Game Management Unit (Unit) 15(C) west and south of a line beginning at the northern boundary of Unit 15(C) and mouth of the Kasilof River at 60° 23’ 19” N; 151° 18’ 37” W, extending south along the coastline of Cook Inlet to Bluff Point (59° 40’ 00” N), then south along longitude line 151° 41’ 48” W to latitude 59° 35’ 56” N, then east to the tip of Homer Spit (excluding any land of the Homer Spit), then northeast to the north bank of the Fox River (59° 48’ 57” N; 150° 58’ 44” W), and then east to the eastern boundary of Unit 15(C) at 150° 19’ 59” W.

Eligible communities: Port Graham and Nanwalek

  • Season: April 2–May 31 and July 1–August 31.
  • Closure: June 1–June 30.

 

Prince William Sound - East

Harvest area: Barrier islands between Strawberry Channel and Softtuk Bar within GMU 6 (B and C).

Eligible communities: Cordova, Tatitlek and Chenega Bay - by Special Registration Permit only. All hunters or egg gatherers must possess an annual permit, which is available from the Cordova offices of the Native Village of Eyak and the U.S. Forest Service.

  • Season: April 2–April 30 (hunting).

May 1–May 31 (gull egg gathering).

  • Closure: May 1–August 31 (hunting).

April 2–30 and June 1–August 31 (gull egg gathering).

Species open for hunting:

greater white-fronted goose; snow goose; gadwall; Eurasian and American wigeon; blue-winged and green-winged teal; mallard; northern shoveler; northern pintail; canvasback; redhead; ring-necked duck; greater and lesser scaup; king and common eider; harlequin duck; surf, white-winged, and black scoter; long-tailed duck; bufflehead; common and Barrow’s goldeneye; hooded, common, and red-breasted merganser; and sandhill crane.

Species open for egg gathering:

glaucous-winged, herring, and mew gulls.

Use of Boats/All-Terrain Vehicles:

No hunting from motorized vehicles or any form of watercraft.

 

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Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Region

 

Tundra Swan Closure – Hunting/egg gathering closed in GMUs 9(D) and 10

Northern Unit (Pribilof Islands)

  • Season: April 2–June 30.
  • Closure: July 1–August 31.

 

Central Unit (Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Region’s eastern boundary west to and including Unalaska Island)

  • Season: April 2–June 15 and July 16–August 31.
  • Closure: June 16–July 15.

 

Black Brant Season Closure – August 16–31 for Izembek and Moffet Lagoons

Western Unit (Umnak Island west to and including Attu Island)

  • Season: April 2–July 15 and August 16–August 31.
  • Closure: July 16–August 15.

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Interior Region

  • Season: April 2–June 14 and July 16–August 31 (hunting). May 1–June 14 (egg gathering).
  • Closure: June 15–July 15.

 

Note: The Central Interior Excluded Area and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough are closed to harvest (see map below). The Central Interior Excluded Area includes the Fairbanks North Star Borough and that portion of GMU 20(A) east of the Wood River drainage and south of Rex Trail, including the upper Wood River drainage south of its confluence with Chicken Creek; that portion of GMU 20(C) east of Denali National Park north to Rock Creek and east to GMU 20(A), and that portion of GMU 20(D) west of the Tanana River between its confluence with the Johnson and Delta Rivers, west of the east bank of the Johnson River, and north and west of the Volkmar drainage, including the Goodpaster River drainage.

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Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta Region

  • Season: April 2–August 31.
  • Closure: 30-day closure dates to be announced*.

 

Special Black Brant Season Hunting Closure – From the period when egg laying begins until young birds are fledged. Closure dates to be announced*

Black Brant – no egg gathering is permitted.

Emperor Goose – no egg gathering is permitted.

*All closure dates to be announced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Alaska Regional Director or his/her designee, after consultation with field biologists and the Association of Village Council Presidents Waterfowl Conservation Committee. Announcements will be broadcast over the local public radio stations.

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Bering Strait/Norton Sound Region

Emperor Goose – no egg gathering is permitted.

Stebbins/St. Michael Area (Point Romanof to Canal Point)

  • Season: April 15–June 14 and July 16–August 31.
  • Closure: June 15–July 15.

 

Remainder of the Region

  • Season: April 2–June 14 and July 16–August 31 (waterfowl).  April 2–July 19 and August 21–August 31 (all other birds).
  • Closure: June 15–July 15 (waterfowl).  July 20–August 20 (all other birds).

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North Slope Region

 

All North Slope Units:

ALERT: Changes to Alaska North Slope Region (Northern/Eastern Units) Spring/Summer Subsistence Migratory Bird In-Season Harvest Closure Dates, 2022

Yellow-billed loons - Yellow-billed loons that are inadvertently entangled in subsistence fishing nets may be kept for subsistence use. Individuals must report each yellow-billed loon found entangled in fishing nets to the North Slope Borough Dept. of Wildlife (907/852-0350) by Aug. 31.

Black Brant – no egg gathering is permitted.

Emperor Goose – no egg gathering is permitted.

Southern Unit

(Southwestern North Slope regional boundary northeast to Icy Cape, and everything west of longitude line 161° 55’ W and south of latitude line 69° 45’ N to the west bank of the Sagavanirktok River and south along the west bank to the North Slope regional boundary, then west to the beginning).

  • Season: April 2–June 29 and July 30–August 31 (seabirds). April 2–June 19 and July 20–August 31 (all other birds).
  • *Closure: June 30–July 29 (seabirds).June 20–July 19 (all other birds).

 

Eastern Unit

(East of eastern bank of the Sagavanirktok River)

  • Season: April 2–June 19 and July 20–August 31
  • *Closure: June 20–July 19

 

Northern Unit

(From Icy Cape, everything east of longitude line 161° 55’ W and north of latitude line 69° 45’ N to the west bank of Sagavanirktok River and north to 71°).

  • Season: April 2–June 6 and July 7–August 31 (king and common eiders). April 2–June 15 and July 16–August 31 (all other birds).
  • *Closure: June 7–July 6 (king and common eiders). June 16–July 15 (all other birds).

 

Special Black Brant Hunting Season: June 20–July 5.

The open area consists of the coastline from the mean high-water line outward to the North Slope regional boundary to include open water and barrier islands from southern Kasegaluk Lagoon from latitude line 69° 16’ N to the north and east to longitude line 158° 30’ W.

North Coastal Zone

*Annual 30-day closure periods in the North Slope Region may differ from fixed dates shown above if environmental and biological conditions warrant such a change. After consultation with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service field biologists, the North Slope Borough (NSB) Department of Wildlife Management, and the NSB Fish and Game Management Committee, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Alaska Regional Director or his/her designee may announce closure dates that differ from those fixed dates.

Within the North Coastal Zone (Cape Thompson north to Point Hope and east along the Arctic Ocean coastline around Point Barrow to Ross Point, including Iko Bay, and 5 miles inland), hunters must present any migratory birds taken for species identification upon request by a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service law enforcement officer and no person may possess any migratory bird or part that is not taken according to the regulations.

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Cook Inlet Region

Harvest area: portions of GMU 16(B) as specified below. Eligible community: Tyonek

  • Season: April 2–May 31— That portion of Game Management Unit 16(B) west of the east bank of the Yentna River, south of the north bank of the Skwentna River, and south of the north bank of Portage Creek to the boundary of Game Management Unit 16(B) at Portage Pass.
  • Season: August 1–31— That portion of Game Management Unit 16(B) west of longitude line 150° 56’ W, south of the north banks of the Beluga River and Beluga Lake, then south of latitude line 61° 26’ 08” N.
  • Closure: June 1–July 31

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Upper Copper River Region

 

Harvest area: GMUs 11, 12, and 13.

Eligible communities: Gulkana, Chitina, Tazlina, Copper Center, Gakona, Mentasta Lake, Chistochina, and Cantwell.

 

GMUs 11 and 13

  • Season: April 15–May 26 and June 27–August 31.
  • Closure: May 27–June 26.

 

GMU 12

  • Season: April 2–June 14 and July 16–August 31 (hunting). May 1–June 14 (egg gathering).
  • Closure: June 15–July 15.

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Bristol Bay Region

Emperor Goose – no egg gathering is permitted.

  • Season: April 2–June 14 and July 16–August 31 (general season). April 2–July 15 (seabird egg gathering only).
  • Closure: June 15–July 15 (general season).

July 16–August 31 (seabird egg gathering).

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Kodiak Archipelago Region

 

 

Cackling Goose is closed to harvest in the Semidi Islands.

  • Season: April 2–June 30 and July 31–August 31 (seabirds). April 2–June 20 and July 22–August 31 (all other birds).
  • Closure: July 1–30 (seabirds).

June 21–July 21 (all other birds).

 

Kodiak Island Roaded Area:

The Kodiak Island Roaded Area is open to the harvesting of migratory birds and their eggs by registration permit only as administered by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence, in cooperation with the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak.***

No hunting or egg gathering for Arctic terns, Aleutian terns, mew gulls, and emperor geese is permitted for the Kodiak Island Roaded Area Registration Permit Hunt.

The Kodiak Island Roaded Area consists of that portion of Kodiak Island (including exposed tidelands) south of a line from Termination Point along the north side of Cascade Lake to Anton Larsen Bay and east of a line from Crag Point to the west end of Saltery Cove. Marine waters adjacent to the Kodiak Island Roaded Area within 500 feet from the water’s edge are included in the Kodiak Island Roaded Area. The Kodiak Island Roaded Area does not include islands offshore of Kodiak Island. A registration permit is not required to hunt on lands and waters outside the Kodiak Island Roaded Area.

 

***The Kodiak Island Roaded Area Registration Permit can be obtained at the offices of the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak, 312 W Marine Way, Kodiak, AK 99615 (907) 486-4449.

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Southeast Alaska

Harvest area: National Forest lands in Icy Strait and Cross Sound, including Middle Pass Rock near the Inian Islands, Table Rock in Cross Sound, and other traditional locations on the coast of Yakobi Island. All lands and waters within Glacier Bay National Park remain closed to all subsistence harvesting.

Eligible community: Hoonah

  • Season: May 15–June 30 (glaucous-winged gull egg gathering).
  • Closure: July 1–August 31.

 

Southeast Alaska, continued

Harvest area: small islands and adjacent shoreline of western Prince of Wales Island from Point Baker to Cape Chacon, but also including Coronation and Warren islands.

Eligible communities: Craig and Hydaburg

  • Season: May 15–June 30 (glaucous-winged gull egg gathering)
  • Closure: July 1–August 31.

 

Southeast Alaska, continued

Harvest area: Icy Bay (Icy Cape to Pt. Riou), and coastal lands and islands bordering the Gulf of Alaska from Pt. Manby southeast to and including Dry Bay.

Eligible community: Yakutat

  • Season: May 15–June 30 (glaucous-winged gull egg gathering).
  • Closure: July 1–August 31.

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Migratory Birds Open for Harvest

You may harvest birds or gather eggs from the following species, within all included areas, except where region-specific restrictions apply (see Region-Specific Regulations on pages 9-26). All bird species not listed are closed to hunting and egg gathering.

Waterfowl

Seabirds

Shorebirds

Greater White-Fronted Goose  Northern Fulmar Black-bellied Plover
Snow Goose Double-crested Cormorant Common Ringed Plover
Emperor Goose Pelagic Cormorant Black Oystercatcher
Canada Goose Pomarine Jaeger Greater Yellowlegs
Cackling Goose Parasitic Jaeger Lesser Yellowlegs
Black Brant Long-tailed Jaeger Spotted Sandpiper
Tundra Swan Bonaparte's Gull Ruddy Turnstone
Gadwall Mew Gull Long-billed Dowitcher
Eurasian Widgeon Herring Gull Bar-tailed Godwit
American Widgeon Slaty-backed Gull Semipalmated Sandpiper
Mallard Glaucous-winged Gull Western Sandpiper
Blue-winged Teal Glaucous Gull Least Sandpiper
Northern Shoveler Sabine's Gull Baird's Sandpiper
Northern Pintail Black-legged Kittiwake Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
Green-winged Teal Red-legged Kittiwake Dunlin
Canvasback Ivory Gull Common Snipe
Redhead Arctic Tern Wilson's Snipe
Ring-necked Duck Aleutian Tern Red Phalarope
Greater Scaup Common Murre Red-necked Phalarope
Lesser Scaup Thick-billed Murre

Waterbirds

King Eider Black Guillemot Red-throated Loon
Common Eider Pigeon Guillemot Arctic Loon
Harlequin Duck Cassin's Auklet Pacific Loon
Surf Scoter Parakeet Auklet Common Loon
White-winged Scoter Least Auklet

Yellow-billed Loon

North Slope Region only (see region-specfic regulations)

Black Scoter Whiskered Auklet Horned Grebe
Long-tailed Duck Crested Auklet Red-necked Grebe
Bufflehead Rhinoceros Auklet

Cranes

Common Goldeneye Horned Puffin Sandhill Crane
Barrow's Goldeneye Tufted Puffin  
Hooded Merganser

Owls

 
Common Merganser Great Horned Owl  
Red-breasted Merganser Snowy Owl  

 

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Legislative History

As early as 1916, Migratory Bird Treaties with Canada and Mexico failed to recognize Alaska’s traditional spring/summer subsistence harvest.

After negotiations, the treaties were amended in 1997. The Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council was created, which included representatives from the Alaska Native community, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acting as equal partners. The Council’s primary purpose is to develop recommendations for the subsistence migratory bird harvest regulations.

Eleven regional management bodies were created to provide local input to the Council on the bird harvest list, regional season dates, methods and means and other annual regulatory recommendations. Additional information on the Migratory Bird Treaties, the Council, harvest surveys, press releases and hunter bulletins can be found at

https://www.fws.gov/office/alaska-migratory-birds/alaska-migratory-bird- co-management-council

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Definitions

Alaska Native means the same as “Native,” defined in section 3(b) of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, 16 U.S.C. 1602(b).

Authentic Native article of handicraft or clothing means any item created by an Alaska Native to which inedible parts of migratory birds authorized for use in handicrafts or clothing are incorporated and which is fashioned by hand, or with limited use of machines, provided no mass production occurs.

Closure means the season is closed to all forms of harvest, including hunting and egg gathering, unless specified otherwise.

Co-management Council means the Alaska Migratory Bird Co-management Council, consisting of Alaska Native, Federal, and State of Alaska representatives as equals.

Edible meat means the meat from the breast, back, thighs, legs, wings, gizzard, and heart. The head, neck, feet, other internal organs, and skin are considered inedible byproducts, and not edible meat, for all provisions of these regulations.

Eligible person means an individual within the State of Alaska who qualifies to harvest migratory birds and their eggs for subsistence purposes during the spring and summer.

Excluded areas are defined on page 5.

Flyway Council means the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, or Pacific Flyway Council.

Game Management Unit, also referred to simply as GMU or Unit, means 1 of the 26 geographical areas listed in the codified State of Alaska hunting and trapping regulations and on maps of the Alaska State Game Management Units.

Immediate family means spouse, children, parents, grandchildren, grandparents, and siblings.

Included areas are defined on page 5.

Indigenous inhabitant means a permanent resident of a village within a subsistence harvest area, regardless of race.

Migratory bird, for the purposes of these regulations, means the same as defined in 50 CFR § 10.12 . Species eligible to harvest are listed on page 29.

Migratory birds authorized for use in handicrafts or clothing means the species of birds listed on page 34 that were taken for food in a nonwasteful manner during the Alaska subsistence-harvest season by an eligible person of an included area.

Native means the same as “Alaska Native” as defined in this section.

Nonwasteful taking means making a reasonable effort to retrieve all birds killed or wounded, and retaining all edible meat until the birds have been transported to the location where they will be consumed, processed, or preserved as human food.

Partner organization or regional partner means a regional or local organization, or a local or tribal government that has entered into a formal agreement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the purpose of coordinating the regional programs necessary to involve subsistence hunters in the regulatory process described in this part.

Permanent resident means any person whose primary, permanent home for the previous 12 months was within a subsistence harvest area in Alaska. Whenever absent from this primary, permanent home, the person has the intention of returning to it. Factors demonstrating a person’s primary, permanent home may include: an address listed on an Alaska Permanent Fund dividend application; an Alaska license to drive, hunt, fish, or engage in an activity regulated by a government entity; voter registration; location of residences owned, rented, or leased; location of stored household goods; the residence of the person’s spouse, minor children, or dependents; tax documents; whether the person claims residence in another location for any purpose; or status as a tribal member of a tribe in a subsistence harvest area.

Sale by consignment means that an Alaska Native sends or supplies an authentic Native article of handicraft or clothing to a person who sells the item for the Alaska Native. The consignment seller need not be an Alaska Native and the Alaska Native craftsman retains ownership of the item and will receive money for the item when it is sold.

Seabirds refers to all bird species listed on page 29 within the families Alcidae, Laridae, Procellariidae, and Phalacrocoracidae (in general: gulls, kittiwakes, jaegers, murres, puffins, auklets, fulmars, and cormorants).

Service Regulations Committee means the Migratory Bird Regulations Committee of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Shorebirds refers to all bird species listed on page 29 within the families Charadriidae, Haematopodidae, and Scolopacidae (in general: sandpipers, plovers, oystercatchers, dunlin, godwits, turnstones, knots, and phalaropes).

State means State of Alaska.

Subsistence means the customary and traditional harvest or use of migratory birds and their eggs by eligible indigenous inhabitants for their own nutritional and other essential needs.

Subsistence harvest areas encompass customary and traditional hunting areas of villages in Alaska that qualify for a spring or summer subsistence harvest of migratory birds under these regulations.

Taxidermy refers to birds preserved and mounted in lifelike representations. Taxidermy does not include preserving bird parts to be integrated into traditional arts and crafts.

Village is defined as a permanent settlement with one or more year-round residents.

Waterfowl refers to all bird species listed on page 29 within the family Anatidae (ducks, geese, and swans).

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Avian Health and Disease

Wild birds can carry many types of disease agents, including influenza viruses. Since 2006, the Department of Interior has sampled birds across Alaska for the highly pathogenic influenza virus, H5N1. To date this virus is rare in North America. The risk of transmitting avian diseases to humans is low. However, we want to ensure that people remember to handle birds safely.

What are the handling precautions for wild birds?

We should always practice good handling procedures while hunting or gathering eggs. To avoid possible exposure to disease agents (viruses, bacteria, etc.) follow the guidelines below:

  • Use clean hunting habits, wash eggs, and cook the foods you get from birds.
  • Don’t handle birds that appear sick or you find dead.
  • Don’t eat, drink or smoke while cleaning birds.
  • Wash your hands with soap & water, alcohol wipes, or gel after cleaning.
  • Clean all tools and surfaces with hot soapy water first, then disinfect using water mixed with 10% chlorine bleach.
  • Keep dead birds cool, clean and dry.
  • Cook your eggs and birds thoroughly (165°F) or until body juices run clear

 

Contact Information

Rural subsistence users would likely be the first to notice sick or dying wild birds, so please help our bird disease monitoring effort by calling toll-free: 1-866-5BRDFLU (1-866-527-3358). Be prepared to report the location, species of birds involved, and date and time found. Again, for your safety, do not handle any sick birds or those found dead.

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Use of Inedible Bird Parts in Authentic Native Handicrafts for Sale

  • Only Alaska Natives may sell or re-sell an “authentic native article of handicraft or clothing” that contains an inedible byproduct of a bird taken for food during the Alaska migratory bird subsistence harvest season. Eligibility can be shown by Tribal Enrollment Card, Bureau of Indian Affairs card, or membership in the Silver Hand program.
  • All sales and transportation of sold items are restricted to within the United States.
  • Each sold item must be accompanied by either a certification (FWS Form 3-2484) signed by the artist or a Silver Hand insignia.
  • Purchasers must retain this documentation and produce it upon the request of a Law Enforcement Officer.
  • “Sales by consignment” are allowed. Each consigned item must be accompanied by either a certification (FWS Form 3-2484) signed by the artist or a Silver Hand insignia. All consignees, sellers, and purchasers must retain this documentation with each item and produce it upon the request of a Law Enforcement Officer. All consignment sales are restricted to within the United States.

 

Only these bird species can be used in handicrafts:

  • Common Loon
  • Tundra Swan
  • Blue-winged Teal
  • Redhead
  • Ring-necked Duck
  • Greater Scaup
  • Lesser Scaup
  • King Eider
  • Common Eider
  • Surf Scoter
  • White-winged Scoter
  • Barrow’s Goldeneye
  • Hooded Merganser
  • Pacific Loon
  • Double-crested Cormorant
  • Black Oystercatcher
  • Lesser Yellowlegs
  • Semipalmated Sandpiper
  • Western Sandpiper
  • Wilson’s Snipe
  • Bonaparte’s Gull
  • Mew Gull
  • Red-legged Kittiwake
  • Arctic Tern
  • Black Guillemot
  • Cassin’s Auklet
  • Great Horned Owl

 

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Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council Representatives

Alaska Native Caucus

Gayla Hoseth P.O. Box 310, Dillingham, AK 99576

Tel: 907/842-6252; Fax: 907/842-5932; Email: ghoseth@bbna.com

 

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Ryan Scott 1255 W. 8th Street, Juneau, AK 99802

Tel: 907/465-4191; Fax: 907/465-4162; Email: ryan.scott@alaska.gov

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Eric J. Taylor 1011 E. Tudor Rd, MS 201, Anchorage, AK 99503 Tel: 907/903-7210; Fax: 907/786-3641; Email: eric_taylor@fws.gov

 

AlaskaMigratoryBirdCo-ManagementCouncil - Regional Representatives

 

Assoc. of Village Council Presidents (Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta Region)

Martin Andrew, c/o Jennifer Hooper, P.O. Box 219, Bethel, AK 99559

Tel: 907/543-7471; Fax: 907/543-5732; Email: jhooper@avcp.org

 

Bristol Bay Native Association (Bristol Bay Region)

Gayla Hoseth, P.O. Box 310, Dillingham, AK 99576

Tel: 907/842-6252; Fax: 907/842-5932; Email: ghoseth@bbna.com

 

Chugach Regional Resources Commission (Gulf of Alaska Region)

Priscilla Evans, P.O. Box 8028, Nanwalek, AK 99603

Tel: 907/281-2274, Fax: 907/281-2252; Email: priscillajevans@yahoo.com

 

Ahtna Intertribal Resource Commission (Upper Copper River Region)

Gloria Stickwan, P.O. Box 649, Glennallen, AK 99588

Tel: 907/822-3476: Fax: 907/822-3495; Email: gstickwan@ahtna-inc.com

 

Kawerak, Inc. (Bering Straits/Norton Sound Region)

Jack Fagerstrom, Box 62020, Golovin, AK 99762

Tel: 907/779-2214, Fax: 907/779-2829; Email: tc.glv@kawerak.org

 

Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Assoc. (Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Region)

Peter Devine, c/o Qagan Tayagungin Tribal Office, Sand Point, AK 99661 Tel: 907/383-5616; Fax: 907/383-5814; Email: buffalopeter@hotmail.com

 

Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak (Kodiak Archipelago Region)

Coral Chernoff, 312 Marine Way, Kodiak, AK 99615

Tel: 907/512-6082; Email: coralchernoff@hotmail.com

 

Maniilaq Association (Northwest Arctic Region)

Cyrus Harris, P.O. Box 256, Kotzebue, AK 99752

Tel: 907/442-7914; Fax: 907/442-7703; Email: charris@maniilaq.org

 

North Slope Borough (North Slope Region)

Taqulik Hepa, P.O. Box 69, Barrow, AK 99723

Tel: 907/852-0350; Fax: 907/852-0351; Email: taqulik.hepa@north-slope.org

 

Tanana Chiefs Conference (Interior Region)

Randy Mayo, P.O. Box 74319, Fairbanks, AK 99707

Tel: 907/699-2128; Fax: N/A; Email: randyamayo@gmail.com

 

Co-Management Council - Executive Director

Patty Schwalenberg, 1840 Bragaw St., Ste 150, Anchorage, AK 99508 Tel: 907/334-0113, Fax: 907/334-9005, Email: patty@crrcalaska.org

_________________________

Assistant Regional Director for Science Applications, International Conservation, and Migratory Bird Management
Migratory Birds
Additional Role(s)
Service Representative for Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council
Expertise
Collaborative Conservation,
Strategic Science Planning
Area
AK
Anchorage, AK
Alaska is home to more than 470 species of birds. Most are migratory birds for which the Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible under international treaties and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. While some of the birds stay in Alaska year-round, most migrate to Canada, Central America, South America...