Ben Wishnek

Man with beard and baseball hat wearing a brown National Conservation Training Center jacket
South Region Early Detection Rapid Response Project Manager
Address

43655 KALIFORNSKY BEACH ROAD
Soldotna, AK 99669
United States

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About Ben Wishnek

Ben Wishnek has been in this role since Spring 2020. Prior to this position Ben was the Wildlife Biologist at Bear Lake NWR in Idaho working on wetland management and restoration with a focus on invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
. Work prior to Bear Lake with the USFWS and other entities was focused on wetland and riparian riparian
Definition of riparian habitat or riparian areas.

Learn more about riparian
management and restoration. In his free time, he enjoys cycling, gardening, cross country skiing and photography amongst other activities.

From The Library

person with a clipboard looking at a patch of plants along a river

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) Alaska Region is working with partners to implement a region-wide integrated pest management (IPM) strategy for terrestrial invasive plants, focused on managing small-scale infestations detected on Service lands and at critical access points off...

zebra mussel on a ruler

This plan will serve as a framework to facilitate quick and effective management response to reports of invasive mussels or snails across Alaska. Rapid response refers specifically to urgent actions taken to eradicate founding populations while these populations are still isolated (Department of...

Split image of an island with the left side populated by a variety of birds  and wildlife and the right side mostly empty except for a few rats

This document outlines rapid response actions that should be taken to a rodent sighting in a previously rodent-free area or in the event of a potential ship grounding and subsequent rat spill. Eradication of established breeding populations of rodents is a much larger and longer-term effort;...

piece of healthy Elodea (bright green aquatic plant with leaves in whorls of 3/4)

This Rapid Response Plan for Elodea is intended to act as an administrative blueprint to how the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) will respond to newly discovered Elodea within Alaska. The goal of this document is to consolidate information and facilitate communication within the USFWS, as...

Hands spreading the top leaves of a growing, healthy white sweetclover

In this document, we provide guidance for treatment options for some of the most widespread invasive plant species found in Alaska, as well as for some species with a high likelihood of becoming invasive in the state. In particular, this document focuses on terrestrial and emergent invasive...