Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you recreate responsibly.

  • Check alerts and local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Consistent with CDC recommendations, all visitors (age 2 and older), who are fully vaccinated are required to wear a mask inside of federal buildings in areas of substantial or high community transmission.. All visitors who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces.
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.


Features

  • Coots

    American Coots

    Have you ever heard of the Toledo Mud Hens minor league baseball team? Ever wonder what a mud hen is? We’ve got an answer for you.

    American Coots

  • Black-billed Magpie Promo

    Black-billed Magpie

    The drama queens of the high desert, if the desert had a reality show, magpies would be the stars, constantly insisting on being the center of attention.

    Black-billed Magpies

  • Osprey & Fish

    Ospreys

    If you’ve got water, there’s a good chance you’ve got an osprey, or “fish hawk.” Lucky you.

    Ospreys

Of Note

Bull Trout Research

Bull Trout

One of the many uses of national wildlife refuges is scientific research into the lives and needs of wildlife, both by FWS researchers, the academic world and occasionally private researchers. On McNary NWR, the FWS has been conducting research into bull trout. Bull trout are salmonid native to the Northwest and are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. On the Walla Walla River, bull trout are captured, PIT tagged (Passive Integrated Transponder), and released back to the river. As the trout move up and down the river (or not), each time they pass by a PIT tag reader, their movement is noted, and FWS scientists in Vancouver, Washington, can track their movements. By knowing how, where and when the bull trout are moving, the FWS can devise and refine plans for their recovery. Just one of the many beneficial uses of your national wildlife refuges.

Osprey Nesting

Osprey

At McNary NWR, we have several osprey nesting platforms. Basically, we put a large, flat platform on top of a telephone pole. Why? Because ospreys nest in the tops of trees near water, and while we have plenty of water, trees are at a premium. Osprey nesting platforms are wildly successful if done correctly and if there is a source of fish. At McNary we’ve had varying success, but the platform just across the slough from our offices has had tremendous success, raising multiple chicks to adulthood over the last few years.

More About Ospreys
I Found A Bird . . .

Bird Rescue

Fledgling

We constantly get calls from people wanting us to take a lost or injured bird. Unfortunately, we do not have the capability to rehabilitate wildlife. Even more unfortunate is that, in many instances, the bird doesn’t need rescuing. Here’s a handy decision tree to help you determine what to do with the bird you found.

Bird Rescue

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

McNary National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS