Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you recreate responsibly.

  • Check alerts and local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Consistent with CDC recommendations, all visitors (age 2 and older), who are fully vaccinated are required to wear a mask inside of federal buildings in areas of substantial or high community transmission.. All visitors who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces.
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.


Features

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    Truly Wild!

    Over 80% of the refuge’s 665,400 acres are designated as wilderness, offering excellent opportunities to explore and enjoy the desert.

    Learn More

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    Pronghorn Recovery

    A management priority for the refuge is to help recover populations of Sonoran pronghorn, the fastest North American land mammal.

    Profile of the Pronghorn

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    Come Help Out!

    Ask about volunteer opportunities to assist with maintenance, interpretation and other projects.

    Get Involved

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    Leaping Hares

    Look for this refuge resident - the jackrabbit. With their tall hind legs, they can reach speeds of up to 40 mph and leap over 10 feet.

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    Where Wildlife Comes First

    National Wildlife Refuges are managed for wildlife and habitat and to ensure future generations will always have wild places to explore!

News

Status of Operations

In keeping with guidance from the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and acting out of an abundance of caution, we are temporarily suspending operations of the Visitor Center. We are committed to doing our part to slow the spread of COVID-19 and to ensure the health and safety of our employees, volunteers, and you--our friends and neighbors. Therefore, planned Refuge events and programs may not take place as scheduled. Refuge lands, including nature trails and outdoor recreational activities, remain open and accessible to the public. Please visit refuge information kiosks or brochure boxes for visitor information and refuge maps. We apologize for any inconvenience and will provide updates as they become available.

Temporary Closure for Public Safety

On March 5th and March 8-11, 2021, access to the southeast corner off Big Eye Mine road around the Salton Tanks area will be closed between the hours of 0700 and 1030. This closure is to ensure public safety while Yuma Proving Grounds conducts a military equipment testing operation.

Bypass Road Opens August 31st

Kofa National Wildlife Refuge has constructed the Castle Dome Bypass Road around private inholdings on the refuge. The bypass road will open for public use on Labor Day weekend (August 31st), restoring southern access to the Castle Dome Mountain area which is popular for hiking, hunting, and other recreation. The road is for high clearance vehicles only. It is not suitable for RV's or trailers.

Updated Refuge Map
Get out into nature

Wilderness on Kofa NWR

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Of the 666,640 acres within Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, 547,719 acres are designated wilderness, making it the second largest wilderness area in Arizona. The important designation helps ensure this amazing desert landscape is protected for future generations. Wilderness designation offers protection from logging or mining and prevents the construction of permanent roads, vehicles or structures.

Learn more here

Featured Stories

Did you know?

Kofa National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1939 for the protection of desert bighorn sheep and other native wildlife following a 1936 campaign by the Arizona Boy Scouts.

About the Refuge

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS