Shutdown Notice
Due to the lapse in federal appropriations, this website will not be updated until further notice. Where public access to refuge lands does not require the presence of a federal employee or contractor, activities on refuge lands will be allowed to continue on the same terms as before the appropriations lapse. Any entry onto Refuge System property during this period of federal government shutdown is at the visitor's sole risk. Please read this important updated message about the closure of National Wildlife Refuge System facilities during the shutdown, and refer to alerts posted on individual refuge websites for the status of visitor facilities and previously scheduled events that may still occur during the shutdown.

For more information, please visit the Department of Interior webpage at https://www.doi.gov/shutdown

Features

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    Truly Wild!

    Over 80% of the refuge’s 665,400 acres are designated as wilderness, offering excellent opportunities to explore and enjoy the desert.

    Learn More

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    Pronghorn Recovery

    A management priority for the refuge is to help recover populations of Sonoran pronghorn, the fastest North American land mammal.

    Profile of the Pronghorn

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    Come Help Out!

    Ask about volunteer opportunities to assist with maintenance, interpretation and other projects.

    Get Involved

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    Leaping Hares

    Look for this refuge resident - the jackrabbit. With their tall hind legs, they can reach speeds of up to 40 mph and leap over 10 feet.

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    Where Wildlife Comes First

    National Wildlife Refuges are managed for wildlife and habitat and to ensure future generations will always have wild places to explore!

News

Safety

US Fish and Wildlife encourages drivers to slow down and drive safely. With vehicle speed being a major factor in crashes and loss of life, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Officers will be conducting high-visible speed enforcement to promote traffic safety on Kofa National Wildlife Refuge.

Road Closure Update

The road is open. Gates are closed but not locked. You will need to open and close them behind you. Obey the 15 mph signs. Be respectful of private property. We are working on an environmental assessment (EA) for a bypass route. The EA will be available for public comment once completed.

Castle Dome McPherson Pass Road Closure
Get out into nature

Wilderness on Kofa NWR

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Of the 665,400 acres within Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, 547,719 acres are designated wilderness, making it the second largest wilderness area in Arizona. The important designation helps ensure this amazing desert landscape is protected for future generations. Wilderness designation offers protection from logging or mining and prevents the construction of permanent roads, vehicles or structures.

Learn more here

Featured Stories

Did you know?

Kofa National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1939 for the protection of desert bighorn sheep and other native wildlife following a 1936 campaign by the Arizona Boy Scouts.

About the Refuge

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS