Midwest Region Ecological Services Conserving the nature of America

Conserving the Nature

of America

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

 

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Service in the Midwest

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin. Find a location near you.

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.
Find a location or office
near you »

 

Tiger Swallowtail butterfly on a coneflower

Tiger swallowtail butterfly on purple coneflower. Photo by Jim Hudgins/USFWS

 

How to Build a Pollinator Garden

 

We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service know that pollinators are the engine that run healthy habitats. While we’ve been actively working to restore and conserve more than 1.3 million acres of land across the midwest, we need your help. Whether you have a few feet on your apartment balcony or several acres, you can make a difference. Follow this easy step-by-step guide to build your own pollinator garden and help ensure the future is filled with pollinators.

 

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Meet the Ohio Ecological Services Field Office

 

 

 

 

A view of Oneida from the shoreline.

The Ohio Ecological Services Field Office is responsible for implementing the Endangered Species Act and overseeing the recovery and conservation of 27 federally listed species across the state. They are the voice for Ohio’s natural resources and are passionate about conserving the remaining natural habitats and resources in the Buckeye State. The Ohio office maintains strong partnerships with federal, state, local agencies and non-governmental organizations for the conservation and management of listed species.

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Spreading the Word on Not Spreading Invasives

 

 

 

Text and images from a poster that says "Least Wanted: Invasive Species." Poster includes photos of common reed, purple loosestrife, Eurasian watermifloil, and starry stonewort.

Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees for the 2010 Enbridge oil spill in Michigan are partnering with a local firm and the Kalamazoo River Watershed Council to get the word out about reducing invasive species in the Fort Custer Recreation Area. This effort is designed to support ongoing work to use biological and other control measures to reduce invasive aquatic plants, including Eurasian watermilfoil and starry stonewort, in several lakes in the recreation area. A "Least Wanted" poster was part of the materials used in the first year of a three-year program to raise awareness among the recreating public and reduce the risk of future introductions of such species.

 

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Fox River NRDA brings recreation closer

 

 

 

Wintering monarchs roosting clusters look dark and dense on the branch tips of Oyamel fir trees in central Mexico.

The Fox River, located in eastern Wisconsin, was contaminated in the 1950s with hazardous chemicals called polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs impacted not only the water quality, but native fish and wildlife, as well as how the local communities use their natural resources.

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Inspiring conservation after listening to the delicate sound of butterfly wings in Mexico

 

 

Wintering monarchs roosting clusters look dark and dense on the branch tips of Oyamel fir trees in central Mexico.

Imagine hiking up a dusty trail to elevations of 10,000 feet, each step moving closer to what appears to be orange and black confetti covering the trees. Through the dense forest, approaching closer and suddenly realizing the confetti is actually thousands of monarch butterflies in roosting clusters resting until they once again begin their migration north.

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Save the Monarch Butterfly

 


 

Scott Hicks selected for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2018 Science Leadership Award

 

 

 

Scott Hicks and former Michigan Senator Carl Levin discuss Kirtland's Warbler habitat.

Scott Hicks, Field Office Supervisor for the Michigan Ecological Services Field Office, is the winner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2018 Science Leadership Award. This award recognizes supervisors who champion the use of science in conservation decision making and who empower their staff to accomplish scientific work and engage the scientific community.

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Michigan Field Office

 


 

Trustees restore Menominee Indian Tribe lands

 

 

 

 

5-Islands Creek after restoration - Photo Credit: Menominee Indian Tribe

Lands and waters important to the Menominee Indian Tribe were restored as part of efforts under the Fox River/Green Bay Natural Resource Damage Assessment. After the damage assessment was conducted, the trustee council determined there was work to be done to restore tribal land and water to a healthy state.

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News Archives


 

What We Do

 

Ecological Services' Region 3 Mission Statement and Goals

 


 

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