Methods to Reduce Bird Collisions with Glass When Remodeling and Designing New Facilities

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Methods to Reduce Bird Collisions with Glass When Remodeling and Designing New Facilities

Every year nearly one billion birds fatally collide with glass in the U.S. While most people consider bird collisions with glass to be an urban phenomenon involving tall, mirrored-glass skyscrapers, the reality is that 56% of collision mortality occurs at low-rise buildings (i.e., one to four stories), 44% at urban and rural residences, and <1% at high-rise buildings (Loss et al. 2014). Many government facilities and refuge visitor centers fit the description of the buildings involved in most bird collisions. Fortunately, low-cost, attractive glass treatments are available for existing buildings, while new builds and remodels can incorporate bird-safe building design and specialized glass. Many of bird-safe measures simultaneously reduce energy costs. Recent research quantifying that bird populations in North America have declined by nearly three billion birds over the last 50 years, deserves a strong response from federal agencies and an increased focus on tangible actions that result in measurable conservation outcomes, such as reducing bird collisions with glass.

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A large bird with brown feathers, white head, and yellow beak flies against a pale blue sky
The Migratory Bird Program works with partners to protect, restore and conserve bird populations and their habitats for the benefit of future generations by: ensuring long-term ecological sustainability of all migratory bird populations, increasing socioeconomic benefits derived from birds,...
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