Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
During the current public health emergency, whenever possible, outdoor recreation sites at national wildlife refuges will remain open to the public.

For local conditions review the information on this website and call ahead.

If visiting one of our location, please ensure public health and safety by following guidance from the CDC and state and local public health authorities. You can do this by maintaining social distancing, avoiding overcrowding and excercising good hygiene.

Features

  • Double rainbow / © Caleb Hickman

    Temporarily Closing Visitor Center

    . . . to slow the spread of COVID-19 and to ensure the health and safety of our employees, volunteers, and you--our friends and neighbors.

    Agency's COVID-19 Announcement

  • Rufous hummingbird / © W. Radke, USFWS

    Refuge Trails Open Sunrise to Sunset

    You are allowed to park at the Refuge entry gate and walk in to enjoy the trails when the gate is not open.

  • Large American black bear 218 X 116

    American black bear

    The American black bear is the smallest of the three bear species found in North America, and are found only in North America.

  • Pronghorn antelope 218 X 116

    Pronghorn antelope

    The pronghorn antelope is not really an antelope, but is the sole descendent of an ancient deer-like family.

  • American kestrel / USFWS

    eBird Observation Entries

    Find out what birds are being seen at the refuge, including the most recent sightings. You can enter your bird sightings also!

    eBird Daily Observations

At Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge

Refuge Flowers Field Guide -

Evening primrose / © Sheryl M. Mayfield

Showcasing Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center's Vast Colors! Enjoy the detailed 53 page pamphlet linked below, which identifies various native flowers and flowering plants seen along the trails around the refuge's Visitor Center. Photographs and drawings of flowering plants are categorized by petal color. Cacti and tree flowers are also included. (The pamphlet guide may take a moment to load and open.)

Field Guide to Flowers / © Sheryl M. Mayfield

Our Final Compatibility Determinations are Complete

Wildlife photographers on refuge / USFWS

The Refuge's previously reviewed, draft Compatibility Determinations (CDs) have been finalized, following last July's period of public comments. The refuge's CDs on Fishing, Cemetery Visitation, Recreation Use in San Lorenzo Canyon, Research, Interpretation, Special Events, Wildlife Photography, and Wildlife Observation have all been finalized and can be viewed in the link below. We thank you for your interest in Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge!

Refuge's Completed Compatibility Determinations (CDs)
We Appreciate Your Support!

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service COVID 19 Announcement

In keeping with guidance from the White House and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and acting out of an abundance of caution, we are temporarily suspending (closing) operations of the Visitor Center at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. We are committed to doing our part to slow the spread of COVID-19 and to ensure the health and safety of our employees, volunteers, and you--our friends and neighbors. Therefore, planned Refuge events and programs may not take place as scheduled. Refuge lands, including nature trails and outdoor recreational activities, remain open and accessible to the public. Please visit refuge information kiosks or brochure boxes for visitor information and refuge maps. We apologize for any inconvenience and will provide updates as they become available. More information is available by calling 505-864-4021 during business hours M-F, 8 am to 4:30 pm.

Refuge Trails Guide with Current Map

Trails Guide and Map

Cottontail on trail / M. Weisenberger, USFWS

See the Refuge's most recent Trails Guide with updated Map!

Sevilleta's Updated June 2018 Trails Guide

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS