Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you recreate responsibly.

  • Check alerts and local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Consistent with CDC recommendations, all visitors (age 2 and older), who are fully vaccinated are required to wear a mask inside of federal buildings in areas of substantial or high community transmission.. All visitors who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces.
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.


Features

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    Native Reptiles

    At least 21 types of snakes call the refuge home, including 6 rattlesnake species. They are an important part of the desert community.

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    Exciting Night Life

    When the sun sets and the desert cools, a host of refuge animals stir, including ringtail cats, pocket mice and 11 species of bats.

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    Cryptic Critters

    Light-colored fur helps mammals reflect heat rather than soak it in. The scales of lizards serve the same purpose.

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    Going Underground

    Many desert animals burrow, including tortoise. They burrow down (sometimes up to many feet) to avoid the summer heat and winter cold.

Take Part in the Refuge

Public Safety

April 7, 2020

During the current public health emergency, whenever possible, outdoor recreation sites at national wildlife refuges will remain open to the public. For now, refuge visitor centers and other public facilities are closed and most scheduled events have been postponed. Refuge Visitor Access Permits are still required to visit Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge and are available at the link below. If visiting one of our locations, please ensure public health and safety, by following guidance from the CDC and state and local public health authorities. You can do this by maintaining social distancing, avoiding overcrowding and exercising good hygiene. For more information, visit our webpage, FWS Coronavirus Response and call for local conditions.

Permits

Access Permits

The refuge requires every individual 18 years of age or over to obtain an access permit to enter the refuge.

Get a Permit
Get out into nature

Wilderness on Cabeza Prieta NWR

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Did you know 803,418 of the 860,000 acres on Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge are designated wilderness?

Learn more here

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS