Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to:

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information
  • Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick


Features

  • DevilsClaw_218x116

    Botanical Gem Has Surprises

    Research conducted on the refuge surprised even the most seasoned botanist as this understudied botanical gem revealed many surprises.

    Botanical Inventory

  • Aerial view of Hay Hollow Wash over San Bernardino Refuge / C. Lohrengel-USFWS

    Companion Refuge

    San Bernardino Refuge protects part of what has historically been the most extensive wetland in northwest Mexico and this Southwest region.

    Protecting the ciénega

  • Lesser long nosed bat / W. Radke, USFWS

    Lesser long-nosed bat

    This endangered bat is about 3” long with a small noseleaf. They feed on nectar from night-blooming plants and are important pollinators.

    Pollinators Matter

  • Yaqui chub / W. Radke, USFWS

    Saving Endangered Yaqui Fish

    Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge was established to protect habitat for the endangered Yaqui chub and Yaqui topminnow.

    Learn more

  • Photo gallery images

    Photo Gallery

    Enjoy images of Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge’s landscape and the wildlife that call it home all or part of the year.

    Photo Gallery

News

Public Safety

April 7, 2020

During the current public health emergency, whenever possible, outdoor recreation sites at national wildlife refuges will remain open to the public. For now, refuge visitor centers and other public facilities are closed and most scheduled events have been postponed. If visiting one of our locations, please ensure public health and safety, by following guidance from the CDC and state and local public health authorities. You can do this by maintaining social distancing, avoiding overcrowding and exercising good hygiene. For more information, visit our webpage, FWS Coronavirus Response and call for local conditions.

FWS Public Health Information

Seeking Public Input

March 27, 2020

The refuge is proposing to open hunting for Badger, Bear, Bobcat, Coati, Coyote, Dove, Fox, Javelina, Mule Deer, Quail, Rabbit, Raccoon, Ring-Tailed Cat, Skunk, and White-Tailed Deer. The public is being invited to provide information that should be considered in the refuges Hunt Plan. Comment period ends April 30, 2020.

Read the documents and submit comments

Saving Endangered Yaqui Fish

Yaqui chub/W. Radke

Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge located in the southeast corner of Arizona was established to protect habitat for the endangered Yaqui chub (Gila purpurea) and Yaqui topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis sonoriensis).

Featured Species: Yaqui Chub - Audio Interview
Featured Stories

Within The Refuge Is A Rare Riparian Forest

The refuge also protects a rare velvet ash-cottonwood-black willow gallery forest.

Refuge Profile

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS