Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
During the current public health emergency, whenever possible, outdoor recreation sites at national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries will remain open to the public. Visitor Centers and other facilities, however, may be closed. Scheduled events may be cancelled. Please follow public health guidelines and avoid congregating. For more information: FWS Coronavirus Response page and call for local conditions.

Of Interest

Fishing & Other Spring Things

March 1, 2020 Jumping Fish

Time to grab your fishing poles and get ready to hit the water! McKay Creek NWR opened to the public on the morning of March 1. The north end of the refuge has been closed all winter to provide sanctuary for wintering waterfowl. Waterfowl are returning north, and the refuge reopened for all of your favorite activities. In addition to fishing, spring is a great time for watching wildlife. The first goslings will be born soon, followed closely by the first ducklings. Keep visiting throughout the spring for a chance to see tiny California quail darting to and fro behind their parents. Many types of swallows will be arriving, and the call of the meadow lark will begin ringing soon. As the weather grows warmer, and we see green appear everywhere, McKay Creek NWR becomes a wonderful place to experience spring!

Help Save Our Bats

Save Our Bats

White-nose Syndrome is a horrible disease threatening our bats—bats critical to our environment and food supply. If you like tequila, mangoes, guavas, or any of over 300 other fruits, take the time to learn what you can do to help the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—and yourself!

White-nose Syndrome
History of McKay Creek

McKay Creek Dam & Refuge History

Dam Illustration

Really like history? This is the page for you. Learn about the making of the McKay Creek NWR and Dam.

History of McKay Creek Refuge & Dam

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River Refuges

McKay Creek National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River Refuges.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS