Facility Activities

Whether you prefer to watch wildlife from the comfort of your car or take a hike or bike on one of the many trails, there is something for everyone at Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge. There are various hunting and fishing opportunities as well for visitors to take part in this longstanding tradition.

There two Hunting Zones on the Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge, the North Zone and the South Zone.

South Zone: On Refuge land south of the main channel of the Trempealeau River and south of State Highway 35/54, a Refuge Permit is required for all hunting activities. Additional...

Plan to explore the 4.5-mile self-guided Prairie’s Edge Tour Loop which is accessible by bikes, pedestrians and vehicles. Along the tour, visit the observation deck and look through the high-powered spotting scopes. There are several short self-guided walking trails and walking on top of the...

Biking on the refuge is a wonderful way to view wildlife and just enjoy the outdoors. Bicyclist can travel on all roads and dikes throughout the refuge unless marked closed.  A portion of the Great River State Trail (GRST) passes through the refuge which makes a great connector for those...

Viewing wildlife is best in spring and fall as migrating birds pass through. The observation deck near the visitor center provides an expansive view of the main pool area where bald eagles, tundra swans, geese, and ducks can be seen from mid-March well into April during spring migration. Warbler...

Exploring the refuge from water is another wonderful way to view wildlife and just enjoy the outdoors. Boats with electric motors and hand-powered craft only are allowed. 

With snow covered prairies and ice capped wetlands, winter season is here and so are great opportunities to explore the refuge. Enjoy the tranquility of the refuge and the beauty of winter wildlife by venturing out on some backcountry ski and snowshoeing trails.  

Taking a stroll with your four legged friend is a great way to enjoy the refuge. Dogs must remain on a leash.

Fishing is a great way to spend time outdoors. Rough fish (carp and buffalo) and bullheads are the dominant species in the refuge pools. Most anglers fish for bullheads from shore. Limited numbers of northern pike are taken each year. Other game fish include bass, bluegill, crappie and yellow...

Whether you prefer to watch wildlife from the comfort of your car or take a hike/bike on one of the many trails, there is something for everyone at the Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge.  There are various hunting and fishing opportunities as well for visitors to take part in this...

Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge is nestled along the Mississippi River in western Wisconsin. The 6,446-acre refuge lies within the Mississippi Flyway. The picturesque drive along the Great River Road National Scenic Byway entices travelers along the way. The refuge is an isolated backwater...

Wildlife photography opportunities are abundant along roads, trails and observation points. Spend the day photographing wildlife for a peaceful way to explore the refuge. Start at the observation deck to get an expansive view of refuge pools and observe large flocks of waterfowl resting and...

Another great way to explore the refuge is running. Many of our visitor like to run the refuge Prairie's Edge Tour Loop. The tour loop is 4.5-miles of a distance, which gives the runner the opportunity to run along the edge of the prairie while enjoying a beautiful landscape.  

With snow covered prairies and ice capped wetlands, winter season is here and so are great opportunities to explore the refuge. Enjoy the tranquility of the refuge and the beauty of winter wildlife by venturing out on some backcountry ski and snowshoeing trails.

Trapping is a wildlife management tool used as well on the refuge. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge offers trapping opportunities to trappers, units for muskrat and beaver during the Wisconsin trapping season.

Trapping is allowed by special use permit Trapping units are...

Collecting mushrooms, nuts and berries for personal use is allowed. However, collecting natural objects such as plants, animals, antlers and objects antiquity is prohibited.

Wildlife watching opportunities are abundant along roads, trails and observation points. Every season brings a new experience!