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Information iconA close-up of a sea snail perched on a coral skeleton emphasizes waves in the coral. (Photo: Gabby Salazar)

Photographers come in all ages and experience levels. Even if you’re just starting out, you can take better nature photos by following a few basic tips. Here are a few to try.

An American bittern blends into its surroundings at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia. (Photo: Gabby Salazar)

american bittern Okefenokee national wildlife refuge Gabby Salazar
A canal’s smooth surface reflects the trees at Okefenokee Refuge. (Photo: Gabby Salazar)
american bittern Okefenokee national wildlife refuge Gabby Salazar

From the Author

When I was 12 years old, my father put a camera in my hands and took me to a friend's backyard bird garden.
The camera opened up a whole new world.

I could see the details in the feathers of the bluebird on the branch across the way. I found lovely shapes on the underside of a leaf. Suddenly, the outdoor world became a place of discovery and artistic wonder.

You don’t have to travel far to take great nature photos. Look for opportunities in your backyard or local refuge. 

Gabby Salazar by Rick Stanley

About the Author

Gabby Salazar is a conservation photographer and social scientist based in Florida. In 2021 she was recognized by the North American Nature Photography Association as the Emerging Photographer of the Year.
Information iconPhotographing mushrooms from below creates a new perspective. (Photo: Gabby Salazar)