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Features

  • Burrowing Owl Promo

    Burrowing Owls

    Looking for all the world like a child's cute stuffed toy, burrowing owls are beloved residents of the shrub-steppe.

    Burrowing Owls

  • Badger Promo

    Badgers

    Tough, grizzled, occasionally grouchy, the badger is the curmudgeon next door—gruff but a good guy with an interesting life story to tell.

    Badgers

  • Mule Deer Promo

    Mule Deer Photo Gallery

    You'll see a lot of mule deer here. There's a good reason for that—Umatilla has one of the most impressive mule deer herds found anywhere.

    Mule Deer Photo Gallery

Watching Wildlife

Watching Wildlife

Watching Wildlife

Want to see more animals on your trip to Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

The Mid-Columbia River Refuges are eight refuges within the Columbia Basin.

Umatilla is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

Follow NWRS Online

 

Of Special Interest

  • Waterfowl Season Hunting Blind Preparation

    HunterOctober 08, 2016

    Umatilla NWR will be holding an annual hunt blind preparation work day. We are looking for volunteers to help with cutting brush/reeds and weave them into the new and old blinds on the McCormack Hunting Area. We will be doing this on Saturday, October 8, 2016. If you’re interested in helping prep the blinds for this year’s hunt, please arrive at the Umatilla Hunter Check Station at 9:00 a.m. Bring boots and gloves. It’s a great way to do a little scouting at the same time.

  • Winter Birdwatching

    Swan

    Each season at Umatilla NWR brings its own sounds. But while many of the sounds of spring, summer and fall are man-made, winter is all about nature. Winter is when people disappear, but waterfowl arrive. First, there are a few ducks in October, then a few more each week. Then without fanfare, the geese are there—first the Canada geese, then the snow geese, arriving by the dozens, then the hundreds, then the thousands. Add a few dozen migrating tundra swans and the bald eagles talked about elsewhere on this site, and you've got one of the best birdwatching opportunities in the Northwest. Come on a non-hunt day (Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays), and there's a good chance you'll have the refuge to yourself.

    Seasons of Wildlife
Page Photo Credits — Mule Deer  At Sunset - Chuck & Grace Bartlett, Burrowing Owl - Jane Abel, Badger - James Perdue, Mule Deer Buck - Chuck and Grace Bartlett
Last Updated: Sep 26, 2016
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