Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you do the following:

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Face masks are required in all federal buildings and on all federal lands.
  • Maintain a safe distance between yourself and other groups.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick


Features

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    History of Currituck

    Learn about the area from when it was used by Native Americans to the present day.

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  • IssuesRotator-Mills

    Issues of Importance

    Currituck National Wildlife Refuge seeks solutions to combat habitat loss and hydrology changes. Learn more about this important work!

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    Invasive Species

    Six exotic species are present within the area and are impacting or have the potential to impact refuge lands.

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Featured Wildlife

Environmental Action Statement

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Environmental Action Statement for Hunt Categorical Exclusion

Environmental Action Statement

What's in the News?

Keep up with information bulletins/news releases from national wildlife refuges in eastern North Carolina

News Releases

Prairie Warbler

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Prairie warblers are commonly found nesting on the Currituck National Wildlife Refuge in the spring and summer. They spend the winter in Central America and the West Indies. They are found in scrubby fields and regenerating forests throughout the eastern and south-central United States.

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Hooded Warbler

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Hooded warblers are occasionally on the Currituck National Wildlife Refuge in the fall. It does nest on the refuge, but it is not common to find it in the spring and summer during nesting season. They spend the winter in Central America and the West Indies. They are found in forested wetlands with shrubby understory throughout the eastern and south-central United States.

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Take a Sneak Peek

Take a Virtual Tour of Currituck National Wildlife Refuge

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There's nothing like experiencing this refuge in person, but take a sneak peek to give you a hint of what's in store for you here!

Virtual Tour of Currituck

About the Complex

Coastal North Carolina National Wildlife Refuges Complex

Currituck National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Coastal North Carolina National Wildlife Refuges Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS