Currituck National Wildlife Refuge was established to preserve, protect and maintain healthy and viable populations of migratory birds, wildlife, fish and plants, including federal and state endangered species and trust species. The refuge restores, enhances and maintains the natural processes and diversity of beach, dune, interdunal, maritime forest and marsh habitats to ensure optimum ecological productivity as well as to protect the water quality of Currituck Sound.

Visit Us

The refuge encompasses sandy beaches, maritime forest, and brackish marsh north of the town of Corolla, North Carolina. Visitors can enjoy fishing, wildlife viewing and photography, boating and hunting. Access to the refuge is by boat or 4WD vehicle (Monkey Island and Swan Island tracts only).

Location and Contact Information

      What We Do

      Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It drives everything on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands and waters managed within the Refuge System, from the purposes for which a national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
      A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

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      is established to the recreational activities offered to the resource management tools used. The refuge works to restore, enhance, and maintain the natural processes and diversity of the unique habitats of the mid-Atlantic barrier island ecosystem through actions such as invasive species invasive species
      An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

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      control, prescribed fire, and impoundment water level management.

      Our Species

      Least terns are the smallest member of the gull and tern family. They are approximately 9" in length. Unlike gulls, terns will dive into the water for small fish. The body of least terns is predominately gray and white, with black streaking on the head. Least terns have a forked tail and narrow...

      Size: 18 cm (7.25 in) in length. Color: Breeding season: Pale brown above, lighter below; black band across forehead; bill orange with black tip; legs orange; white rump. Male: Complete or incomplete black band encircles the body at the breast. Female: Paler head band; incomplete breast band....

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