Features

  • Mardon Skipper Promo

    Mardon Skippers

    Small and seldom seen, the Mardon skipper is having a tough time hanging on in Washington. Conboy Lake NWR is one of its last strongholds.

    Mardon Skipper

  • Elk In Aspen Promo

    Rocky Mountain Elk

    Massive antlers, bodies weighing up to 700 pounds, shaggy manes, distinctive calls—it's no wonder everyone loves elk.

    Rocky Mountain Elk

  • Sandhill Cranes Promo 2

    Sandhill Cranes

    Wolves and geese notwithstanding, the call of a Sandhill crane is the call of the wild.

    Sandhill Cranes

  • Western Gray Squirrel Promo

    Western Gray Squirrel

    However you might feel about squirrels—love 'em, hate 'em—the fact remains this is a species that needs our help.

    Western Gray Squirrel

Enjoying Conboy Lake

Winter

Snowflakes

Brrr. It’s cold and frozen and snowy here at Conboy Lake. But life goes on, and there are things to see. Elk and deer and coyotes. Cougar tracks in the snow. Hawks and ravens and woodpeckers. And the scenery, oh, the scenery. Looking across the prairie to snow-clad Mt. Adams, sunlight reflecting off a billion surfaces, almost too dazzling to the eye. Yes, life has slowed, and the refuge has changed with the passing of the seasons, but Conboy Lake is a still a magical place even in winter, perhaps especially in winter.

Seasons of Wildlife

Help Save Our Bats

Save Our Bats Logo

White-nose Syndrome is a horrible disease threatening our bats—bats critical to our environment and food supply. If you like tequila, mangoes, guavas, or any of over 300 other fruits, take the time to learn what you can do to help the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—and yourself!

White-nose Syndrome
Want To Know About . . .

Watching Wildlife

Deer Illustration

Want to see more animals on your trip to Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuges

Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuges.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS