Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to:

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information
  • Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick


Features

  • Coyote / USFWS

    A Desert Oasis

    Wildlife thrives in this environment where temperatures reach 120 degrees in the summer and the average rainfall is two inches per year.

    Learn More

  • Treelined path / Jenny and Oliver Davis ©

    Enjoy, Explore, Learn!

    Get outside and explore Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, managed for the benefit of wildlife and you.

    Recreational Opportunities

  • Farming refuge crops / USFWS

    Ancestral Home

    The Yuma Tribes of the Colorado River farmed the river‘s floodplain, which flooded annually depositing rich soils for crops.

    About the Refuge

  • Informational sign at trail head / Jenny and Oliver Davis ©

    Where Wildlife Comes First

    National Wildlife Refuges are managed for wildlife and habitat and to ensure future generations will always have wild places to explore!

News

Status of Operations

In keeping with guidance from the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and acting out of an abundance of caution, we are temporarily suspending operations of the Visitor Center. We are committed to doing our part to slow the spread of COVID-19 and to ensure the health and safety of our employees, volunteers, and you--our friends and neighbors. Therefore, planned Refuge events and programs may not take place as scheduled. Refuge lands, including nature trails and outdoor recreational activities, remain open and accessible to the public. Please visit refuge information kiosks or brochure boxes for visitor information and refuge maps. We apologize for any inconvenience and will provide updates as they become available.

Inconsistent Telephone Access

November 5, 2019

The refuge is experiences erratic telephone service. Calls may go through, but if the automatic voicemail system begins, refuge staff will not currently be able to retrieve those voicemails. If you need to speak with someone, please call back until a live person answers. Office hours are from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Contact Us

Seeking Public Input

April 1, 2020

Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is accepting public comments from April 1st to April 30th on a draft Refuge Hunt Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Compatibility Determination. The draft documents propose to increase hunting opportunities through expanding hunting hours on some Refuge Hunt Units, adding huntable species to current Hunt Units, as well as opening a new hunt for Eurasian collared-dove.

Read the drafts and provide input

Safety

US Fish and Wildlife encourages drivers to slow down and drive safely. With vehicle speed being a major factor in crashes and loss of life, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Officers will be conducting high-visible speed enforcement to promote traffic safety on Cibola National Wildlife Refuge.

Featured Stories

Visitor Center Hours & Scheduling

Visitor Center entrance / Oliver Davis ©

If you need to conduct business with the refuge or are planning to stop by the visitor center, you are encouraged to call ahead and make an appointment. The Visitor Center is open during the winter (Nov 1st-Mar 14th) seven days a week, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm MST. In the summer months (Mar 15th-Oct 31st) the refuge has fewer volunteers and a lot of the refuge staff are out in the field. Call (928) 857-3253 for an appointment.

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About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS