A marine national monument is an ocean area designated by a presidential proclamation under the Antiquities Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service partners with the  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), state and territorial governments and others to manage marine national monuments that conserve the ocean and remote islands and atolls within the National Wildlife Refuge System. NOAA and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service cooperatively manage four marine national monuments in the Pacific Ocean and one in the Atlantic.

Located in the Mariana Archipelago east of the Philippines, the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument protects approximately 95,216 square miles of submerged lands and waters. The Mariana Trench is the deepest place on Earth, deeper than the height of Mount Everest above sea level. It is five...
Welcome to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument! Located 130 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, the Monument is a biologically diverse area encompassing 3.1 million acres of open ocean – an area approximately the size of Connecticut. It was established by Presidential...
Welcome to the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument! The Monument encompasses approximately 495,189 square miles of open ocean, coral reef, and island habitats, making the total area of the Monument nearly five times the size of all the U.S. National Parks combined and nearly twice the...
Welcome to Rose Atoll Marine National Monument! Established on January 6, 2009, by President George W. Bush, Presidential Proclamation 8337 gave the secretary of the interior management responsibility for the monument in consultation with the secretary of commerce. This prohibits commercial...
The first and only mixed (natural and cultural) World Heritage Site in the United States, it includes Midway Atoll and Hawaiian Islands national wildlife refuges, plus the Battle of Midway National Memorial and the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve. The monument is home to...