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The Best Anglers

Watching Wildlife

Ducks

Want to see more animals on your trip to Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

The Mid-Columbia River Refuges are eight refuges within the Columbia Basin.

Toppenish is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

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Enjoying Toppenish

  • Watch For Wildlife

    Bunny

    The days are turning shorter and the nights colder. Fall is the time of year when wildlife is on the move, preparing for a difficult winter. While winters in the Columbia Basin aren’t that stressful to wildlife, nonetheless creatures here follow the natural instincts of their kind everywhere and are on the move preparing for winter. This is also the time of year when young are dispersing, leaving their birthplace to find territories of their own. Drivers need to slow down and keep a constant watch for wildlife. Haven’t you noticed more dead animals along the road lately? There’s always an upswing of wildlife-vehicle collisions in the fall. So, if getting home 23 seconds sooner is worth squashing a squirrel, mangling a marmot, bashing a beaver, or demolishing a deer, then by all means, keep driving like you’re on the NASCAR circuit. Apart from the permanent damage to wildlife, you’ll incur several hundred dollars worth of damage to your car. So, why don’t you just follow the traffic laws instead? Both your fellow drivers and our wildlife will thank you.

  • Working With Water

    Backhoe Illustration

    Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge is adding to its wetland acreage with the conversion of a weed infested upland to approximately 30 acres of prime wetland habitat! The restoration will not only increase the amount of feeding and loafing habitat available for migratory and wintering water birds, but will also improve the function of the adjacent wetlands by providing greater connectivity.

    Resource Management
Page Photo Credits — Muskrat - Michael Bamford, Steelhead Jumping Falls - Greg Shields
Last Updated: Nov 01, 2014

Events

  • 2014 Events Calendar

    Snowy Owl - EventsJanuary 01, 2014

    We've summarized our of events for you in PDF format. Things do change, so please look at the event details in the calendar.

    2014 Events Calendar (PDF)
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