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Know Before You Go

Know Before You Go

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While out on the refuge, waterproof footgear or old sneakers are recommended during most seasons in the Wilderness Area. Mosquitoes, ticks, and deer flies may be numerous from May to September throughout the refuge, so insect repellent and protective clothing are advisable. Ticks can transmit Lyme disease, which has been found in the area.

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About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

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What's Happening

  • Visitor Activities

    Visitor Activities Promo

    There are a wide variety of visitor activities available at Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge including wildlife viewing, photography, environmental education and hunting.

    Learn more about activities on the refuge.
  • Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge Boosts Local Economy

    November 06, 2013

    Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey generated $3.2 million for Bergen, Essex, Morris, Somerset and Union Counties in Fiscal Year 2011, according to a new economic analysis. The benefit – which includes retail sales, taxes and job income – came from visitor spending tied to recreation activities on the refuge. The refuge returned $3.51 for every $1 appropriated, calculated in 2011 dollars. The figures come from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study, called Banking on Nature, which used 92 of the more than 550 national wildlife refuges for its economic sampling. Wildlife refuges pumped $2.4 billion into the economy and supported more than 35,000 private-sector jobs in Fiscal Year 2011. Refuges contributed an average $4.87 in total economic output for every $1 appropriated and produced nearly $793 million in job income for local communities. The refuges are part of the National Wildlife Refuge System, managed by the Service. “Our National Wildlife Refuge System is the world’s greatest network of lands dedicated to wildlife conservation but is also an important contributor to our economy, attracting more than 46 million visitors from around the world who support local restaurants, hotels, and other businesses,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Every dollar we invest in our Refuge System and other public lands generate huge dividends for our country.” Activities on Great Swamp Refuge include wildlife viewing and hunting. Researchers examined visitor spending in four areas − food, lodging, transportation and other expenses (such as guide fees, land-use fees and equipment rental). Local economies were defined as those within 50 miles of each of the 92 refuges studied. Learn more about the study here: http://1.usa.gov/185tp06

    Click here to download a copy of the 2013 Banking on Nature Report
Page Photo Credits — All photos courtesy of USFWS unless otherwise noted., Main photo - Jim Mulvey
Last Updated: Mar 25, 2014
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