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Features

  • Coyote Sentinel

    Coyotes

    Possibly the most adaptable animal in North America (raccoons might disagree), coyotes thrive almost anywhere—including shrub-steppe.

    Coyotes

  • Basalt Columns

    Geology

    Columbia NWR has a fascinating—and violent—geologic history. To truly know the refuge, you have to understand its past.

    Geology

  • Cedar Waxwings Kissing

    Photo Galleries

    Some incredible photographers have donated some incredible photographs. If you can't visit Columbia NWR, this is a great consolation prize.

    Photo Galleries

  • Washington Ground Squirrel Promo

    Washington Ground Squirrels

    Too cute by half, Washington ground squirrels unfortunately spend most of the year below ground. Too bad; you can never get enough of them.

    Washington Ground Squirrels

  • Rattlesnake Promo

    Rimrock Species

    Columbia NWR is blessed with an abundance of rock faces, cliffs and crevices—perfect habitat for many species.

    Rimrock Species

Of Interest

Watching Wildlife

Chickadee

Want to see more animals on your trip to Columbia National Wildlife Refuge? Ready to add to your birding "Life List?" Here are some wildlife viewing tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River Complex

The Mid-Columbia River Refuges are eight refuges within the Columbia Basin.

Columbia is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

Follow NWRS Online

 

Learn About Our Resources

  • Baby, It’s Hot Outside

    Black-tailed Jackrabbit

    It surprises a lot of people that the “Evergreen State” of Washington is largely arid—and it gets hot, often into triple digits for long stretches. We can beat the heat by heading to air conditioning. However, the animals of Columbia NWR don't have that luxury. How do they cope?

    Beating The Heat
  • Feeding Our Waterfowl

    Tractor

    We are getting dinner ready for this fall's visitors—ducks and geese! How do we do that? First, we need to control the intruders that limit and destroy the duck's dinners—cattails, tules, phragmites and reed canarygrass. These plants choke out what ducks love to eat and sometimes grow so thick that ducks have no place in the water to land! The marshy areas where these aggressive plants grow are being dried out and disced to set back succession. This allows good duck food to grow in their stead. While some wetlands are being dried to kill invasive plants, other wetlands are being irrigated to give moisture to the preferred duck food—smartweed, nodding beggartick, barnyard grass, swamp timothy and water plantain. Every 2-3 weeks from June through September these marsh areas are flooded and then dried to stimulate the growth of desirable waterfowl food. In fall and winter, the ponds are fully flooded to provide safe feeding and resting areas for the thousands of ducks and geese that visit. Visit us this winter to see if our efforts paid off!

    Managed Wetlands
Page Photo Credits — Sandhill Crane Profile - Aditi the Stargazer (www.flickr.com/people/aditithestargazer/), Coyote Sentinel - Bandelier National Monument/Sally King, Basalt Columns - Gordon Warrick, Cedar Waxwings Kissing - Gordon Warrick, Washington Ground Squirrel - Dennis Paulson, Rattlesnake - Gordon Warrick, Black-tailed Jackrabbit - Tom Spinker, Drumheller Channels National Natural Landmark - Gordon Warrick
Last Updated: Aug 01, 2014

Events

  • 2014 Events Calendar

    Snowy Owl - EventsJanuary 01, 2014

    We've summarized our of events for you in PDF format. Things do change, so please look at the event details in the calendar.

    2014 Events Calendar (PDF)
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