Features

  • Akepa rotator item

    ‘Ākepa

    Their "kee-wit" calls are quiet and their songs are a short, warbling trill.

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  • Akiapolaau rotator item

    ‘Akiapōlā‘au

    When searching for food, it makes a tapping noise that can be mistaken for a woodpecker.

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  • Amakihi rotator item

    ‘Amakihi

    The Hawaiian name 'amakihi is derived from the word kihi or kihikihi, meaning curved.

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  • Apapane rotator item

    ‘Apapane

    They feed heavily upon nectar from the ‘ōhi‘a tree and is one of its most important pollinators.

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What's Happening at the Refuge

Teaching Change and Imi Pono - Hawai'is Youth

Teaching Change

With the end of the school year comes the end of Teaching Change trips to Hakalau Forest NWR until school starts up again, but in the meantime refuge staff will be working closely with the Three Mountain Alliance and Teaching Change staff to facilitate a program similar to Teaching change; Imi Pono No Ka Aina. For this program intermediate and high school aged students visit the refuge for three days. In that time they learn about Hakalau's biological and cultural history as well as plant anywhere from 400 to 1000 native trees. The trip culminates in a morning spent bird watching, where students can master their skills in identifying native Hawaiian birds and their calls. Below you can learn more about the Teaching Change program: The Teaching Change Program is an outdoor youth education program on Hawai’i Island that connects middle and high school students to one of the most intact tropical montane wet forests in the State, Hakalau NWR. Monthly 2-day trips involves curriculum that combines classroom lectures and outdoor activities studying the dynamics of native plant and animal phenology, species interactions, and lessons that convey how climate change may impact Hawaiʻi’s biota. By educating our local youth about wildlife biology and natural resource management while integrating cultural components, Teaching Change looks to inspire and empower the next generation of conservationists and natural resource scientists in Hawaiʻi, from Hawaiʻi. Teaching Change is a collaborative effort between the University of Hawaiʻi CTAHR-NREM, the Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, the US Fish & Wildlife Service, and the Friends of Hakalau Forest. Contact Blaire Langston, Teaching Change Program Coordinator, blairej@hawaii.edu

Teaching Change

2018 is a Successful Nesting Season for Nene

This past nesting season at Hakalau Forest set records! Nene pairs produced a cumulative total of 38 nests, from which 48 goslings hatched, a record setting count since the refuge was established in 1985. All 48 goslings have not yet been counted for, however, as of today, 36 of them have been sighted and are known to be fully fledged, meaning they have grown their adult feathers and are flying. Due to their ability to fly, banding them has not been an easy task, yet a total of five Nene goslings have been banded thus far. Now that they have been banded, they can be identified and monitored throughout future seasons. Some of them may even have nests of their own at the refuge next fall.

Closed - Public Access Area

June 27, 2016 Maulua Public Access Sign

With regret, we have decided to close our public access area, the Upper Maulua Unit, to self-guided activities. As new information about Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death (ROD) is coming out all the time and ​more is learned about the extent of its occurrence and the probable means of spreading of this serious disease, we want to take every precaution to minimize the risk of unwittingly spreading the fungus while conducting an otherwise very beneficial activity​. ​ ROD has not been confirmed on the Refuge at this point​, but recent observations in the area and discussions with our research partners at U.S. Department of Agriculture and University of Hawai'i have heightened the level of concern for Hakalau Forest.​ Additional sampling efforts have been undertaken as a precaution. ​More information about Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death can be found at:

http://www.ohiawilt.org
Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death Detected by USFWS Hakalau

USFWS Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death

FWS Biologist - ROD Sampling 180x240

Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death, a fungal disease caused by Ceratocystic spp., has recently been detected on Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawai‘i Island. With regret, access to the refuge will remain closed to the public which includes self-guided activities in the Upper Maulua Unit. As new information about Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death (ROD) is coming out all the time, more is learned about the extent of its occurrence and the probable means of spreading of this serious disease; we want to take every precaution to minimize the risk of unwittingly spreading the fungus while conducting an otherwise very beneficial activity. The state of Hawai‘i, scientific organizations, and other federal agencies have been engaged in combatting ROD for the last several years.

Hakalau ROD Media Release & Photos

About the Complex

Big Island Complex

Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Big Island Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS