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Features

  • Burrowing Owl Promo

    Burrowing Owls

    Looking for all the world like a child's cute stuffed toy, burrowing owls are beloved residents of the shrub-steppe.

    Burrowing Owls

  • Badger Promo

    Badgers

    Tough, grizzled, occasionally grouchy, the badger is the curmudgeon next door—gruff but a good guy with an interesting life story to tell.

    Badgers

  • Mule Deer Promo

    Mule Deer Photo Gallery

    You'll see a lot of mule deer here. There's a good reason for that—Umatilla has one of the most impressive mule deer herds found anywhere.

    Mule Deer Photo Gallery

Watching Wildlife

Watching Wildlife

Watching Wildlife

Want to see more animals on your trip to Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

The Mid-Columbia River Refuges are eight refuges within the Columbia Basin.

Umatilla is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

Follow NWRS Online

 

Of Special Interest

  • Duck Hanky Panky

    Crazy Duck

    See a duck behaving oddly between December and March? You’re likely catching ducks in the act of courtship! Mallards rapidly pumping their heads up and down? How about males raising their bodies out of the water, pulling their heads up and whistling, then grunting? Often a bunch of males do this together to show off to females. Common goldeneye males throw their heads violently backwards to bounce of their backs while giving a little kick. Northern shovelers engage in exciting aerial displays as they erratically twist, dip and circle. In the water, shoveler drakes bill-jerk and neck-stretch to impress the girls. These elaborate courtship rituals encourage cooperation in choosing to pair.

  • Spring Is Here

    Long-billed Curlew

    As the days start to get warm and longer, be on the lookout for Umatilla's many spring-time visitors. The long-billed curlews arrived on March 13th and are preparing to nest; look for them foraging in the farm fields and in the flat grassy areas of the refuge. While curlews may be the star of the show, many other spring-time birds can be found, including western meadowlarks and Say's phoebes. The colorful birds of spring may be what catches your eye, but don't forget to look down! Wildflowers are starting to bloom, as well, and dot the ground with beautiful bursts of color. Oregon sunshine are a small yellow flower blooming now and long-leafed phlox in a light purple will soon follow. Whatever spring-time beacon you are in search of, you can find it on your visit to Umatilla NWR.

Page Photo Credits — Mule Deer  At Sunset - Chuck & Grace Bartlett, Burrowing Owl - Jane Abel, Badger - James Perdue, Mule Deer Buck - Chuck and Grace Bartlett
Last Updated: Mar 16, 2015

Events

  • 2015 Events Calendar

    Snowy Owl - EventsJanuary 01, 2015

    We've summarized our of events for you in PDF format. Things do change, so please look at the event details in the calendar.

    2015 Events Calendar (PDF)
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