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Features

  • Coots

    American Coots

    Have you ever heard of the Toledo Mud Hens minor league baseball team? Ever wonder what a mud hen is? We’ve got an answer for you.

    American Coots

  • Black-billed Magpie Promo

    Black-billed Magpie

    The drama queens of the high desert, if the desert had a reality show, magpies would be the stars, constantly insisting on being the center of attention.

    Black-billed Magpies

  • Osprey & Fish

    Ospreys

    If you’ve got water, there’s a good chance you’ve got an osprey, or “fish hawk.” Lucky you.

    Ospreys

Improve Your Experience

Watching Wildlife

Deer

Want to see more animals on your trip to Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

The Mid-Columbia River Refuges are eight refuges within the Columbia Basin.

McNary is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

Follow NWRS Online

 

Of Special Interest

  • Waterfowl Hunting Lottery

    Bird HuntingSeptember 11, 2015

    The lotteries for waterfowl hunting in the Fee Hunt Area are open. The lottery closes at 3:30 p.m. on September 11, so you've got plenty of time to register. Good luck.

    McNary Waterfowl Hunting Lotteries
  • Ospreys & Baling Twine

    Osprey

    Osprey are common along our rivers and lakes—anywhere there is water and fish. Unlike most other birds, they make little attempt to hide their nests, making it easy to follow a nest from egg laying right through the young leaving the nest to fend for themselves. Unfortunately, the manner in which ospreys build their nests clashes with our propensity to litter. In the wild, ospreys often line their nests with lichens, mosses and grasses. However, they will readily use substitute materials, which, sadly, often means baling twine and fishing line. The problem is it can kill them. All too often, they become entangled in the line, suffering gruesome deaths by strangulation or starvation. Researchers at the University of Montana estimate that as much as 10 to 30 percent of osprey chicks and adults in some areas are killed by this baling twine, fish nets, or fishing line. Every year, we’re called to rescue an entangled osprey, but we often arrive too late, or don’t have the resources to pull off a rescue. Many utility companies, such as the Benton REA, have been wonderful partners in helping us rescue ospreys, but we really need your help. When you’re outside, pick up any twine, rope, fishing line, etc.—you may just be saving one of these magnificent birds from a cruel death.

    University of Montana Osprey Project
Page Photo Credits — Gray Squirrel - Chuck and Grace Bartlett, American Coot - J. Michael Raby, Black-billed Magpie - Chuck and Grace Bartlett, Osprey & Fish - Andy Morffew, White Pelican - Ingrid Taylar
Last Updated: Aug 10, 2015

Events

  • 2015 Events Calendar

    Snowy Owl - EventsJanuary 01, 2015

    We've summarized our of events for you in PDF format. Things do change, so please look at the event details in the calendar.

    2015 Events Calendar (PDF)
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