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  • Acropora Polystoma

    Acropora polystoma

    Colonies are irregular clumps with tapered branches of similar length and shape.

  • Montipora Peltiformis

    Montipora peltiformis

    This coral has an encrusting base and will develop plates or scrolls with a textured appearance.

  • Tubastraea Coccinea

    Tubastraea coccinea

    Orange-cup coral, an invasive species, may compete with native benthic invertebrates by compromising the space in their communities.

Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument

The World's Largest Marine Protected Area

Rare Yellow hawkfish thumbnail

Baker Island National Wildlife Refuge and six other national wildlife refuges are seemingly just dots near the equator of the Pacific Ocean, but upon a closer look these islands, reefs, and atolls are at the epicenter of Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, the largest marine conservation area in the world. These refuges host terrestrial and marine life in numbers and unique and specialized life forms beyond our imagination and they provide a safe haven for millions of birds and marine life that swarm to shallow areas and islands to rest, to feed, to mate, and to give life to their off-spring.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Marine Monuments Program

Baker Island National Wildlife Refuge is managed by the Fish & Wildlife Service in the Marine Monuments Program of the Pacific Islands Refuges and Monuments Office (PIRAMO). For more information contact: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Baker Island National Wildlife Refuge, Box 50167, Honolulu, HI 96850 808-792-9540.

Monuments and Refuges of the Central Pacific Ocean

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System


The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

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Protecting the Pacific's Cultural and Historical Heritage

Hui Panala‘au: Hawaiian Colonists in the Pacific

Colonizing the islands was a harrowing experience that claimed the lives of three young men: Carl Kahalewai who died of appendicitis in 1938, and Joseph Keliihananui and Richard “Dickey” Whaley who were killed during an attack on the island on December 8, 1941.

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Page Photo Credits — James Maragos/USFWS
Last Updated: Nov 25, 2015
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