Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office
Pacific Southwest Region
   
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"The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is: working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people."
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Endangered Species
McDonald Rockcress, ES Program Link
The Endangered Species Program in the Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office has the responsibilities for activities specified under the Endangered Species Act of 1973... MORE-->
Fisheries

Mouth of Klamath, Fisheries Program Link

 
The Fisheries Program focus is to design and conduct investigations that guide and evaluate the success of aquatic habitat restoration efforts that will lead to the recovery...MORE-->
 
Restoration

Salt River, Restoration Program Link

The Arcata Conservation Partnerships Program is comprised of two biologists and a fluvial geomorphologist/engineer that work in partnership with local entities and landowners to...MORE-->
 
Science Application: SHC
 


 
 
The Strategic Habitat Conservation Team is a pilot program that is clearing the path for a new way of addressing conservation concerns in Calif., Nevada, and the Klamath Basin. MORE-->

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Water Control Structure Inventory Map Image

During the summer of 2006, the Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office conducted an inventory of water control structures around Humboldt Bay, California. This project was co-funded by the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation, and Conservation District, California Department of Fish and Game, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The objective of this project was to develop a GIS database containing spatial data for all tidegates, culverts, and other water control structures surrounding Humboldt Bay. This information was considered important for the development of a strategic approach to estuarine restoration, and for the development of improved management strategies for operation, replacement, or modification of the structures where needed. The information was also considered critical in planning for protection of property and habitats in the event of an oil spill...More Details


Last updated: December 11, 2014