Yreka Fish and Wildlife Office
Pacific Southwest Region
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Partners
Partners for Fish and Wildlife

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Yreka Office has been working in partnership with private landowners to restore streams, wetlands, and other important wildlife habitats since 1987. The purpose of the voluntary Partners for Fish and Wildlife program is to assist landowners with the restoration, enhancement, and protection of habitat on their property. The program originally targeted migratory waterfowl, but it has been expanded to include projects that benefit endangered species, anadromous fish, and migratory birds. Both technical and financial assistance are available.

Partners for Fish and Wildlife Goals:

  • Implement and promote habitat conservation on private lands which benefit Federal trust species.
  • Provide leadership and develop partnerships necessary to accomplish habitat conservation.
  • Educate the general public on the importance of habitat conservation and encourage their participation in these efforts.

Information and Requirements:                           

  • Projects must result in the restoration, enhancement, or protection of fish and wildlife habitats.
  • Projects must be on private land.
  • The Fish and Wildlife Service’s contribution to a project is limited to less than 50% of the total cost.  Other Federal, State and private funds may be used to make up the remainder of the cost.

Examples of projects funded, in part, by Partners for Fish and Wildlife through the Yreka Fish and Wildlife Office (Yreka FWO):

Yreka Creek Riparian Fencing and Planting
This Partners project is on a cattle ranch along Yreka Creek, a tributary of the Shasta River, which is an important tributary of the Klamath River. Our goal with this project is to restore riparian and in stream habitat by excluding livestock from the riparian zone and planting trees along the banks of the stream. Elevated water temperatures and nutrients create water quality Riparian fencing on Yreka Creek.  Photo by Larry Alexander, Resource Managementproblems in Yreka Creek. By restricting grazing along the stream, the landowner is allowing riparian vegetation to recover. This increases shade, which in turn, lowers water temperatures and improves habitat for riparian and aquatic species, including the threatened coho salmon, as well as other salmonids and migratory birds.  Our partners installed fencing in the spring of 2008 to protect 2.4 miles of streambank and its adjacent riparian zone. Plantings of native riparian trees and shrubs are now underway in the cattle exclusion area, which will create shade, cover and additional habitat for years to come.

Riparian fencing on Yreka Creek. Photo by Larry Alexander,
Resource Management]



Shasta Water Association Dam Demobilization and Water Quality Improvements Project

Historically, the Shasta River was a major salmon-producing tributary of the Klamath River. Populations of Chinook and coho salmon, and steelhead trout have greatly declined in the Shasta due to habitat problems in the Shasta and parts of the mainstem Klamath River. Barriers that block migration of young salmon are one of the problems in this important tributary. The Shasta Water Association dam was built in 1910 to facilitate the diversion of water for irrigation. The dam became a significant fish passage barrier, restricting fish passage during the irrigation season. Also, the water impounded by the dam was low in oxygen and too warm for salmon and Shasta Water Association Dam in winter prior to removal.  Photo by Jennifer Silveira, USFWStrout. The Shasta Water Association partnered with Yreka FWO’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program and the National Fish Passage Program, the Shasta Valley Resource Conservation District, and other State and Federal agencies to remove the dam and replace it with two rock weirs. The weirs allow year-round passage for the fish, while backing up enough water for the Association to divert their legal water right. As a result, the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program and the National Fish Passage Program helped re-connect 29 miles of habitat upstream of this Shasta River dam.


Shasta Water Association Dam in winter prior to removal.
Photo by Jennifer Silveira, USFWS]


Middle Klamath Restoration Education Project: Involving Students in Hands-on Restoration
The Mid-Klamath Watershed Council is a community watershed restoration group that brings watershed and fisheries education to schools in a Wild and Scenic section of the Klamath River. By funding this project, the Yreka FWO took the program a step further by bringing high school Outdoor classroom.  Photo by Mid-Klamath Watershed Counciland middle school students into the field. Students learned about fish and wildlife habitat restoration techniques while they worked as volunteers on actual restoration projects.  By giving students hands-on experience, they acquire specialized skills and knowledge that may empower and inspire them to pursue careers in habitat restoration. Land stewardship is a profession that can offer employment opportunities in the local community.   




Outdoor classroom. Photo by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council

We have funded many projects in the Yreka FWO area

Contacts
Any of Yreka FWO’s Habitat Restoration Staff can assist with project funding through the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program or you can contact the Yreka Fish and Wildlife Office at 1829 South Oregon Street, Yreka CA 96097; or you may contact the front office at 530-842-5763.

Links:

National Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program Website

Regional Partners for Fish and Wildlife ProgramWebsite.

Partners
Lower Klamath River Sub-basin - all tributaries/watersheds of the Klamath River from mouth to confluence with Trinity River. Contact: Yurok Tribal Fisheries Program .

Middle Klamath River Sub-basin - all tributaries/watersheds of the Klamath River from confluence with Trinity River to Iron Gate Dam.  Contact: Karuk Tribe of California Department of Natural Resources, Mid-Klamath Watershed Council , and Upper Mid-Klamath Watershed Council .

Salmon River Sub-basin - watershed of the Salmon River. Contact: Salmon River Restoration Council.

Scott River Sub-basin - watershed of the Scott River. Contact: Scott River Watershed Council and Siskiyou Resource Conservation District .

Shasta River Sub-basin - watershed of the Shasta River. Contact: Shasta River Coordinated Resource Management Planning Committee and Shasta Valley Resource Conservation District .