National Wildlife Property Repository - FAQs

Conserving America's Future

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • FThis boot was covered in suede in attempts to conceal its true material, caiman.. Credit: USFWS.

    This boot was covered in suede in attempts to conceal its true material, caiman. Credit: USFWS.


  • The National Wildlife Property Repository houses nearly 1600 pairs of boots manufactured from many different animal skins such as crocodile, caiman, elephant, shark, stingray, pangolin, cobra, and sea turtle.. Credit: USFWS.

    The National Wildlife Property Repository houses nearly 1600 pairs of boots manufactured from many different animal skins such as crocodile, caiman, elephant, shark, stingray, pangolin, cobra, and sea turtle. Credit: USFWS.

How can I tour or visit the Repository?
The National Wildlife Property Repository is not open to the public, but we do schedule tours for community conservation and education organizations. Please visit the Education page for more information. Tours for the general public are scheduled on the first Friday of each month. Please see the General Public page for more information.

-How can I request to use confiscated property items for scientific or education purposes?
The Donation program at the National Wildlife Property Repository seeks to aid conservation education and scientific research through confiscated property donations. Please visit the Requesting Property from the Repository page to learn more about requesting wildlife property items.

-Do you accept donations and abandonments from the public?
The Repository is able to take certain donations and abandonments including legally obtained ivory. Please visit the Donations Program page to learn more about donating wildlife property items the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

-Where can I find out more information about wildlife trade laws?
Visit the laws and regulations overview for a brief discussion on some of the major laws related to wildlife trade. The page also includes links to more information through U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s International Affairs.

-What can I do to help species affected by wildlife trafficking?
Help reduce demand for endangered and threatened wildlife and wildlife products obtained illegally by becoming an informed consumer. When in doubt, ask questions about the source of a product or skip purchasing all together. You can learn more or consider supporting the work of those that help combat wildlife trafficking.

Simple acts that support the environment and biodiversity help as well. Protection of species and ecosystems generates respect for wildlife and benefits our health long term.

-Can I volunteer at the Repository?
The Repository has a small group of dedicated volunteers that assists the wildlife property program in receiving, donating, and inventorying confiscated wildlife property items. There are also educational outreach opportunities available throughout the year to create awareness on the effects of wildlife trade and trafficking.

For information about volunteering at the Repository please contact: nwpr@fws.gov