Skip Navigation

Pollutants

BullTrout_ESBanner_USFWS.jpg

Fish and wildlife serve as indicators of our environment’s health and, ultimately, our own.

The use, disposal, and accidental releases of toxic substances can have unintended consequences for fish, wildlife, and their habitats. 

 

  • Pollutants and Climate Change

    NOAA - Fisheries

    Pollutants can contribute to the population decline of fish and wildlife species, affect their overall health and fitness and prevent their recovery in many ways.

    Learn more

  • Investigation and Technical Assistance

    Riverine Landscape

    The Environmental Contaminants (EC) staff focuses first on the prevention of environmental contamination to the environment. We also identify potential effects of toxic substances to natural resources and work with partners to prevent or minimize those effects.

    Learn more

  • Oil Spills

    GULF OF MEXICO - View from above shows Coast Guard Cutter Cypress' skimmer hard at work in a large patch of oil. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Ensign Frankie L. Temple

    Many people are familiar with the large, catastrophic oil spills of national significance, such as the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill and the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill.  However, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that in the U.S. there are 70 relatively smaller oil spills that occur every day.

    Photo: GULF OF MEXICO - View from above shows Coast Guard Cutter Cypress' skimmer hard at work in a large patch of oil. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Ensign Frankie L. Temple. 

    Learn more

  • Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR)

    NOAA - Fisheries

    The ultimate goal of NRDAR is to restore fish and wildlife habitats following oil spills and releases of hazardous substances, to the condition they would have been had it not been for the contaminant release into the environment.

    Learn more

Return to main navigation