Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office
A Unit of the
Pacific Southwest Region
Ecological Services | California

Latest News Stories

One hundred and fifty-one unarmored threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus williamsoni) were rereleased into the wild in Los Angeles County April 14 after a summer fire forced an emergency rescue of the endangered fish.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a draft habitat conservation plan (HCP) for activities related to the construction of the new Cal Coast Replacement Pipeline in Santa Barbara County. The draft HCP outlines strategies to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to the federally threatened California red-legged frog and the Santa Barbara distinct population segment of the federally endangered California tiger salamander.
Wildlife officials and members of the public have seen higher than usual numbers of stranded or dead marine mammals and birds along southern California beaches in recent weeks. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center are working together to document the size and scope of affected wildlife and mortalities. Stranding reports have included loons, grebes, cormorants, California brown pelicans, and California sea lions. Many loons are currently migrating through the Santa Barbara Channel on their spring migration northward.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a draft habitat conservation plan (HCP) for operation and maintenance activities related to the California Flats Solar Project, a solar energy facility in southeastern Monterey and northern San Luis Obispo Counties in California. The draft HCP outlines strategies to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox and federally threatened California red-legged frog, California tiger salamander, and vernal pool fairy shrimp.
While Californians and visitors flock to the beaches this spring and summer, a much smaller resident will share the shoreline: the western snowy plover (Charadrius nivosus nivosus). The small birds, found along America's western coastline from Washington to Baja California, Mexico, are usually only six inches long and weigh up to two ounces. They have been federally protected as a threatened species since 1993.
This February, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honored two conservation partners whose collaboration and innovation has supported the conservation of rare wildlife and brought awareness to the threats facing animals native to the southern and central California coast.
During the start of winter, monarchs west of the Rocky Mountain region begin their flight to the California coastline to roost amidst groves of eucalyptus, Monterey cypress and Monterey pine. The Pismo Beach Monarch Butterfly Grove is one of the largest overwintering sites for monarch butterflies in California. Hazel Rodriguez interviews U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Lara Drizd during the annual Western Monarch Butterfly Day celebration to learn why thousands of both butterflies and people flock here each winter, and how you can support the majestic monarch migration.
We'd like to share the insider's scoop about the people who carry out the important work of protecting and conserving fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats along the central and southern California coast. We'll be featuring profiles from members of our team over the coming months in a series we're calling Faces of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We hope you enjoy reading our stories as much as we enjoy writing them!
The Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office invites you read and share our 2016 Year in Review, a compilation of conservation success stories from the people of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who work to protect fish, wildlife, plants, and natural habitats of the central and southern California coast.
On a rare rainy morning during winter break in Goleta, Calif., high school students from Fillmore Unified School District joined U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) biologists to study and admire overwintering Western monarch butterflies at the Ellwood Mesa Open Space Preserve. Nestled between the Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific coastline of Santa Barbara County, the site provides western monarch butterflies a winter home within a grove of eucalyptus trees.
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Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office
US Fish and Wildlife Service
2493 Portola Road, Suite B
Ventura, California 93003

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