Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office
A Unit of the
Pacific Southwest Region
Ecological Services | California

Latest News Stories

Seven-year-old Mairenee delicately places the tiny coastal dune plant into the sand with care not to damage its fragile roots. In her eyes one can see determination, admiration, and even hope in returning this small patch of earth back to its natural state. Mairenee joins more than 30 of her classmates on an early spring morning at Monterey State Beach as part of the Return of the Natives volunteer brigade, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to dune restoration run by California State University, Monterey Bay.
For the first time in nearly 70 years, western snowy plovers are nesting on Los Angeles County beaches. The first nest was found on April 18 on Santa Monica State Beach, followed by discovery of a nest on Dockweiler State Beach on April 27, and two nests on Malibu Lagoon State Beach on April 28 and May 4. Following their discovery, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) biologists installed small wire cages around each nest to protect the eggs from predators and human disturbance.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will release a draft habitat conservation plan (HCP) for public comment on May 8, 2017 for construction and renovation of buildings and infrastructure at the existing Scotts Valley Middle School in Santa Cruz County, California. The draft HCP outlines strategies to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to the federally endangered Mount Hermon June beetle.
Bird enthusiasts in California, Oregon, Washington, and Baja California, Mexico, will participate in a coast-wide survey of California brown pelicans the evening of May 6 in an effort to better understand the status of this popular, yet troubled seabird. The survey is conducted with the intent to gather information needed to understand how potential threats from changes in weather patterns, prey availability, or changes in habitat or contaminants could impact California brown pelican populations over time.
When Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and The Who were playing at the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967, just down the road the Santa Cruz long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum croceum) was struggling to survive. This little amphibian, which measures four to six inches long from snout to tail, was known to exist in just two coastal ponds in Santa Cruz County, one of two coastal counties surrounding California's Monterey Bay. With both ponds facing development and permanent conversion to other urban uses, the salamander's future was uncertain. The species first gained federal protection under the Endangered Species Preservation Act in March 1967, and maintains its endangered status under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.
The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and an array of conservation partners broke ground today, officially marking the start of a planned ecological restoration of a former golf course in Goleta.
One hundred and fifty-one unarmored threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus williamsoni) were rereleased into the wild in Los Angeles County April 14 after a summer fire forced an emergency rescue of the endangered fish.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a draft habitat conservation plan (HCP) for activities related to the construction of the new Cal Coast Replacement Pipeline in Santa Barbara County. The draft HCP outlines strategies to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to the federally threatened California red-legged frog and the Santa Barbara distinct population segment of the federally endangered California tiger salamander.
Wildlife officials and members of the public have seen higher than usual numbers of stranded or dead marine mammals and birds along southern California beaches in recent weeks. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center are working together to document the size and scope of affected wildlife and mortalities. Stranding reports have included loons, grebes, cormorants, California brown pelicans, and California sea lions. Many loons are currently migrating through the Santa Barbara Channel on their spring migration northward.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a draft habitat conservation plan (HCP) for operation and maintenance activities related to the California Flats Solar Project, a solar energy facility in southeastern Monterey and northern San Luis Obispo Counties in California. The draft HCP outlines strategies to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox and federally threatened California red-legged frog, California tiger salamander, and vernal pool fairy shrimp.
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Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office
US Fish and Wildlife Service
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Ventura, California 93003

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