Migratory Birds
Conserving the Nature of America in the Southwest Region
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Year of the Bird 2018 World Migratory Bird Day
Migratory Bird Highlights HotTopics

Backyard Bird Count

2018
The Great Backyard Bird Count is a free, fun, and easy event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of bird populations. University of New Mexico Wildlife Biology student Jason Kitting explains how anyone can participate in the Great Backyard Bird Count. The count took place on Feb 16-19, and similar events are coming up in May, October, and December 2018.

 

Attendees enjoy the events at World Migratory Bird Day 2018. Credit: Indu Roychowdhury, USFWS.
Attendees enjoy the events at World Migratory Bird Day 2018. Credit: Indu Roychowdhury, USFWS.

World Migratory Bird Day 2018

June 2018
The Albuquerque BioPark’s botanic garden hosted World Migratory Bird Day 2018. Coordinated by Environment for the Americas and observed during the second weekend of May in the Western Hemisphere, World Migratory Bird Day is an event that celebrates the beauty and diversity of avian life. This year, as we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, partners around the country are celebrating “The Year of the Bird” with special events such as this one.

Read the entire story...

 


Bald eagle. Credit: USFWS.
Bald eagle. Credit: USFWS.

Draft Environmental Assessment for Bald Eagle take Permits and the Osage Wind Project

May 2018
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have prepared this Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA; 42 U.S.C. §§ 4321 et seq.). This DEA evaluates the effects of proposed issuance of a Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) take permit that is incidental to otherwise lawful activities associated with the operation of the Osage Wind Project, Osage County, Oklahoma. We are posting this DEA to our website for a 30-day public comment period, ending on July 1, 2018. Please direct your comments to Joe Early, Native American Liaison at 505-248-6602 (joe_early@fws.gov) and to Heather Coe Clark, 505-248-6878 (heather_coeclark@fws.gov).

Read the Draft Environmental Assessment

 

Golden eagle. Credit: USFWS.
Golden eagle. Credit: USFWS.
Draft Environmental Assessment Open for Public Comment

February 2018
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepared this Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA; 42 U.S.C. §§ 4321 et seq.). This DEA evaluates the effects of issuing a 1-year permit for take of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) that is incidental to otherwise lawful activities associated with the operation of the Granite Target Site at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. We are posting this DEA to our website for a 30-day public comment period, ending on March 23.

Read the Draft Environmental Assessment

 

 

 

Southwest Region employees help out at Migratory Bird Day 2017. Credit: Heather Coe Clark, USFWS.
Southwest Region employees help out at Migratory Bird Day 2017. Credit: Heather Coe Clark, USFWS.
Celebrating International Migratory Bird Day 2017

Migratory birds took center stage this past month at the Albuquerque BioPark’s annual International Migratory Bird Day (IMDB) celebration. Migratory Bird Program staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southwest Region helped educate the public about migratory birds at the event. With the theme of “helping birds along the way,” staff explained the importance of places like Albuquerque and surrounding areas as stopover sites for migratory birds. Service staff also helped visitors identify the different kinds of ducks in New Mexico using a fun wing identification game, which created the opportunity to talk to them about migratory bird conservation and management. Visitors were given copies of this year’s IMDB poster and enjoyed hearing about the Migratory Bird Program and getting the chance to interact with real duck wings. Learn more about International Migratory

Learn more about Bird Day

 

A fledging Cooper's hawk. Credit: Kristin Madden, USFWS. A fledging Cooper's hawk. Credit: Kristin Madden, USFWS.
Creating A Rapport with Raptors
USFWS tips for co-existing with urban birds of prey

The two most common raptor-related issues we see with this time of year are aggressive raptors protecting a nest and people “rescuing” fledging raptors found on the ground. Both increase the frequency of human-raptor encounters and both can have negative impacts for both the birds and residents of the community. However, by following simple advice, we hope to empower local residents to respond appropriately.

Read the Do's and Don'ts for urban raptors.

 

 

Playa Country Radio: Celebrating 100 Years of Bird Conservation

Listen to a discussion on passenger pigeons, the roots of migratory bird conservation in the U.S., and the importance of the Migratory Bird Treaty on the latest edition of Playa Country Radio. This discussion incudes Jennifer Duberstein, Coordinator for the Sonoran Joint Venture, Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
( http://pljv.org/radio_episodes/celebrating-100-years-of-bird-conservation/
)

Visit the Southwest Region Migratory Bird Centennial page to learn more about bird conservation in the Region.

And to learn more about the Migratory Bird Centennial, visit www.fws.gov/birds/MBTreaty100/

 

waterfowl on water

Waterfowl. Federal Duck Stamp image.

Waterfowl Population Report

Attached is the Waterfowl Population Status Report.  In North America the process of establishing hunting regulations for waterfowl is conducted annually. The process involves a number of scheduled meetings in which information regarding the status of waterfowl is presented to individuals within the agencies responsible for setting hunting regulations. This report includes the most current breeding population and production information available for waterfowl in North America and this report is intended to aid the development of waterfowl harvest regulations in the United States for the 2015–2016 hunting season. Thanks to everyone involved in this important, annual, cooperative, international effort, especially those folks in the air and out on the ground.

Read the Waterfowl Population Report
Watch the Status of Waterfowl video

 
2016 marked the centennial of the Convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory Birds - also called the Migratory Bird Treaty - that was signed on Aug. 16, 1916. This  Migratory Bird Treaty (446.6KB), and three others that followed, form the cornerstones of our efforts to conserve birds that migrate across international borders.

Read more about the Migraytory Bird Centennial

 
Photographic Guide for Aging Nestling Cooper's Hawks. Credit: USFWS.
Download a copy of the Photographic Guide for Aging Nestling Cooper's Hawks
 
Migratory Bird Population Surveys
 
International Migratory Bird Day is Now World Migratory Bird Day
 
Watch the Buff-breasted Sandpiper video.
 
duck stamp
Buy Duck Stamps
 
Golden eagle. Credit: USFWS.
Bald and Golden Eagle Management Public Scoping Process
 
Mosquito. Credit: USFWS.
West Nile Virus
Detecting new, emerging and introduced diseases and maintaining long term surveillance of domestic disease problems affecting wild birds
- learn more
 

bald eagle chicks. Credit: USFWS.
Eagle Nest Camera Guidance

 
Hummingbird extracting nectar from flower. Credit: USFWS.
Rufous Hummingbird -
Featured
Pollinator
 
 
Last updated: July 31, 2018