Migratory Birds
Conserving the Nature of America in the Southwest Region
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Year of the Bird 2018 World Migratory Bird Day
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Bald eagle at Maxwell NWR. Credit: USFWS.
Bald eagle at Maxwell NWR. Credit: USFWS.

Draft Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Issuance of an Eagle Incidental Take Permit for Thunder Ranch Wind

June 2019
We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have prepared this Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA; 42 U.S.C. §§ 4321 et seq.).  This DEA evaluates the effects of proposed issuance of a Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) take permit that is incidental to otherwise lawful activities associated with the operation of the Thunder Ranch Project, Garfield, Kay and Noble Counties, Oklahoma.  We are posting this DEA to our website for public comment period, ending on August 13, 2019. Please direct your comments to MB_nepacomments@fws.gov. If you would like to arrange a consultation, please contact Mary Elder, Assistant Regional Director, External Affairs at 505-248-6285 or mary_elder@fws.gov.

Read the Draft EA

 

Deputy Regional Director Jeff Fleming and Deputy Chief of Migratory Birds Kristin Madden join members of Urban Forestry and partners to celebrate Albuquerque's Urban Bird Treaty Partnership. Credit: USFWS.
Deputy Regional Director Jeff Fleming and Deputy Chief of Migratory Birds Kristin Madden join members of Urban Forestry and partners to celebrate Albuquerque's Urban Bird Treaty Partnership. Credit: USFWS.

Albuquerque’s Urban Bird Treaty Partnership
Rededication Event, May 11, 2019

May 2019
On World Migratory Bird Day, the Albuquerque Urban Bird Coalition and the City of Albuquerque Parks and Recreation Department held an event honoring the conservation work done by partners since Albuquerque was first designated as an Urban Bird Treaty City in 2014. The City of Albuquerque and Bernalillo County shared new proclamations that rededicate their commitment and outline specific initiatives for conservation. The City of Albuquerque Parks and Recreation Department unveiled their new logo and designated the Cooper’s hawk as the mascot for their Urban Forestry program and the Albuquerque Urban Bird Coalition shared the new Birdwatching Guide for Albuquerque.

Download the poster.
Downlaod a copy of the new Birding Map for Albuquerque.

 

Raptor wearing a falconry hood. Credit: Kristin Madden, USFWS.
Raptor wearing a falconry hood. Credit: Kristin Madden, USFWS.

Falconry Techniques May Help Decrease Stress and Time Required to Pre-condition Raptors for Release

New research published in the Journal of Wildlife Rehabilitation reveals how certain falconry techniques may help decrease stress and time required to pre-condition raptors for release. Lead author and Deputy Chief of Migratory Birds for the Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kristin Madden, has personally been integrating falconry techniques into raptor rehabilitation for a decade. To better understand the effectiveness of specific falconry-based methods, Madden and her co-author, Matthew Mitchell, alternated use of traditional rehabilitation procedures with falconry techniques on 45 raptors. The results of the work revealed that certain falconry techniques, including the use of hoods, tethers and falconry exercises, have the potential to reduce behaviors indicative of stress, improve feather condition, and reduce the amount of time required to condition raptors before release.

Read the full abstract: Case study: the use of falconry techniques in raptor rehabilitation.

 

A fledging Cooper's hawk. Credit: Kristin Madden, USFWS. A fledging Cooper's hawk. Credit: Kristin Madden, USFWS.
Creating A Rapport with Raptors
USFWS tips for co-existing with urban birds of prey

The two most common raptor-related issues we see with this time of year are aggressive raptors protecting a nest and people “rescuing” fledging raptors found on the ground. Both increase the frequency of human-raptor encounters and both can have negative impacts for both the birds and residents of the community. However, by following simple advice, we hope to empower local residents to respond appropriately.

Read the Do's and Don'ts for urban raptors.

 

 

Playa Country Radio: Celebrating 100 Years of Bird Conservation

Listen to a discussion on passenger pigeons, the roots of migratory bird conservation in the U.S., and the importance of the Migratory Bird Treaty on the latest edition of Playa Country Radio. This discussion incudes Jennifer Duberstein, Coordinator for the Sonoran Joint Venture, Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
( http://pljv.org/radio_episodes/celebrating-100-years-of-bird-conservation/
)

Visit the Southwest Region Migratory Bird Centennial page to learn more about bird conservation in the Region.

And to learn more about the Migratory Bird Centennial, visit www.fws.gov/birds/MBTreaty100/

 

waterfowl on water

Waterfowl. Federal Duck Stamp image.

Waterfowl Population Report

Attached is the Waterfowl Population Status Report.  In North America the process of establishing hunting regulations for waterfowl is conducted annually. The process involves a number of scheduled meetings in which information regarding the status of waterfowl is presented to individuals within the agencies responsible for setting hunting regulations. This report includes the most current breeding population and production information available for waterfowl in North America and this report is intended to aid the development of waterfowl harvest regulations in the United States for the 2015–2016 hunting season. Thanks to everyone involved in this important, annual, cooperative, international effort, especially those folks in the air and out on the ground.

Read the Waterfowl Population Report
Watch the Status of Waterfowl video

 
2016 marked the centennial of the Convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the Protection of Migratory Birds - also called the Migratory Bird Treaty - that was signed on Aug. 16, 1916. This  Migratory Bird Treaty (446.6KB), and three others that followed, form the cornerstones of our efforts to conserve birds that migrate across international borders.

Read more about the Migraytory Bird Centennial

 
Download a copy of the New Birding Map for Albuquerque.
 
Photographic Guide for Aging Nestling Cooper's Hawks. Credit: USFWS.
Download a copy of the Photographic Guide for Aging Nestling Cooper's Hawks
 
Migratory Bird Population Surveys
 
International Migratory Bird Day is Now World Migratory Bird Day
 
Watch the Cooper's hawk release video clip.
 
 
Watch the Buff-breasted Sandpiper video.
 
duck stamp
Buy Duck Stamps
 
Golden eagle. Credit: USFWS.
Bald and Golden Eagle Management Public Scoping Process
 
Mosquito. Credit: USFWS.
West Nile Virus
Detecting new, emerging and introduced diseases and maintaining long term surveillance of domestic disease problems affecting wild birds
- learn more
 

bald eagle chicks. Credit: USFWS.
Eagle Nest Camera Guidance

 
Hummingbird extracting nectar from flower. Credit: USFWS.
Rufous Hummingbird -
Featured
Pollinator
 
 
Last updated: July 17, 2019