Hurricane Harvey
Conserving the Nature of America in the Southwest Region
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Recovery and Restoration Efforts

   
Steady Recovery Along the Texas Coast
By Abra Zobel
October 2017

Damaged fishing pier at Aransas NWR. Credit: Jeff Adams, USFWS.
Damaged fishing pier at Aransas NWR. Credit: Jeff Adams, USFWS.

Refuges along the Texas coast are steadily recovering from damages sustained during Hurricane Harvey. At Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, the public use pier was dangerously unstable after much of the sand and concrete embankment below it was eroded away by storm surge. Maintenance crews and other employees worked hard to get the pier repaired and reopened to the public quickly. It's once again a great place for some fishing, wildlife watching, photography, or just a quiet moment in nature.

Repaired fishing pier at Aransas NWR. Credit: Jeff Adams, USFWS.Repaired fishing pier at Aransas NWR. Credit: Jeff Adams, USFWS.

 

Damage to Repair Along the Texas Gulf Coast
by Beth Ullenberg
October 2017

Damage from Hurricane Harvey to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands and facilities along the Texas Gulf Coast was widespread.  Employees quickly began recovery efforts to safely re-open areas hit by the storm and restore public access. 

An employee runs a road grader to repair a road washed out by  the hurricane on Texas Chenier Plains National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Credit: USFWS.An employee runs a road grader to repair a road washed out by the hurricane on Texas Chenier Plains National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Credit: USFWS.

Aransas National Wildlife Refuge was heavily damaged by  Harvey.   Employees safely demolition a collapsed maintenance  building.  Credit: USFWS.Aransas National Wildlife Refuge was heavily damaged by Harvey.   Employees safely demolition a collapsed maintenance building.  Credit: USFWS. 

A damaged building is re-roofed at Aransas National Wildlife  Refuge. Credit: USFWS.A damaged building is re-roofed at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS.

Oyster Bay Boat Ramp on Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge was rendered unusable by the storm. Employees quickly got to work clearing the boat ramp of storm debris and restoring fishing access. Credit: USFWS.Oyster Bay Boat Ramp on Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge was rendered unusable by the storm. Employees quickly got to work clearing the boat ramp of storm debris and restoring fishing access. Credit: USFWS.

 

Downed or snagged trees were everywhere after the storm. Employees worked in crews to clear roads and parking lots. Credit: USFWS.Downed or snagged trees were everywhere after the storm.  Employees worked in crews to clear roads and parking lots. Credit: USFWS.

A popular pier at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge took significant damage, but re-opened after crews completed repairs and the structure passed a safety inspection. Credit: USFWS.A popular pier at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge took significant damage, but re-opened after crews  completed repairs and the structure passed a safety inspection. Credit: USFWS.

 

Service Begins Hurricane Harvey Recovery Efforts

September 2017
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands and facilities on the Gulf Coast of Texas continue to be impacted by the effects of Hurricane Harvey and the unpresented rain event that followed. Service personnel from several states are assisting with recovery efforts on national wildlife refuges along the coast. Crews are assessing damage to buildings, roads, infrastructure and habitat. Where conditions are safe, clean up efforts are underway. We are working to open lands and facilities to the public as safely and quickly as possible. Safety remains our top priority and will continue to guide every action as we move forward.

 
Hurricane Harevy Flicker Album
Hurricane Harvey Flickr

Hurricane harvey fact Sheet
Hurricane Harvey Response Fact Sheet

FEMA Federal Resource page for Hurricane Harvey
FEMA Federal Resources for Hurricane Harvey

Last updated: August 1, 2018