Mexican Wolf
Southwest Region Ecological Services
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Mexican wolf pups huddle in the den. Credit: USFWS.
Mexican wolf pups huddle in the den. Credit: USFWS.
The Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Reintroduction of the Mexican gray wolf was initiated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in March 1998. Mexican wolves living in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) are designated as a nonessential experimental population which allows for greater management flexibility to address wolf conflict situations such as livestock depredations and nuisance behavior. The MWEPA is a defined geographic area that encompasses Arizona and New Mexico from Interstate 40 south to the international border with Mexico.

Middle Fork AM871 investigates a food cache with a bear. Credit: Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team.
Middle Fork AM871 investigates a food cache with a bear. Credit: Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team.

The Mexican Wolf reintroduction project is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in collaboration with the following cooperating agencies: Arizona Game and Fish Department, USDA Forest Service, USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services, and the White Mountain Apache Tribe. These agencies, along with the Arizona Counties of Gila, Graham, Greenlee, and Navajo, and the Eastern Arizona Counties Organization work together under a formal Memorandum of Understanding which provides a framework for collaboration that is based in sound science and which enables the signatories to develop a mutually-agreeable, long-term collaboration in reintroduction of Mexican wolves in Arizona and New Mexico within the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area as defined in the 2015 Final Rule governing reintroduction.

Reintroduction of a top predator such as the Mexican wolf is highly complex and often controversial. It is important to understand the role Mexican wolves are playing on the landscape, including all of the potential biological, social and economic impacts - be they good, bad, or indifferent. In order to continually evaluate this role, an Interagency Field Team (IFT) has been formed and has the primary responsibilities of collecting data, monitoring, and managing the free-ranging Mexican wolf population. Equally important is the IFT's close interaction and involvement with local communities directly affected by wolf recovery. Read additional information about the Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project and it can be found on Arizona Game and Fish Department's web page at: https://www.azgfd.com/Wildlife/speciesofgreatestconservneed/mexicanwolves/ .

 
Mexican wolf experimental population map
Download copy of Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Map. USFWS.
 
Map of recent wolf locations
Recent Wolf Locations (ArcGIS)
 
Download Mexican Wolf Home Range map.
 
Mexican Wolf Recovery Area Population Estimate - 12/31/2017
 
 
Last updated: June 15, 2018