skip to content

Southeastern plants

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the plants the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A green plant with mint-like leaves and bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Ocmulgee skullcap. Photo © by Alan Cressler, used with permission.

    Ocmulgee skullcap

    Taxon: Plant Range: Georgia, South Carolina Status: Under review First described in 1898, the Ocmulgee skullcap is a rare herbaceous perennial plant found only in the Savannah River (Georgia and South Carolina) and Ocmulgee River (Georgia) watersheds. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was petitioned to list the species in April 2010 and issued a 90-day finding that the petitioned action may be warranted in September 2011. The species is currently under review for possible listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with purple and red coloring around the edges of leaves and stems growing in the sand.
    Information icon Seabeach amaranth in North Carolina. Photo by Dale Suiter USFWS

    Seabeach amaranth

    Seabeach amaranth is a low-growing annual that occurs on sandy beaches from South Carolina to Massachusetts. Threats to this species include sea level rise, habitat modification and recreational use of beaches.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small yellow flower with red markings extends from a fern-like plant.
    Information icon Sensitive joint-vetch. Photo by dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Sensitive joint-vetch

    Taxon: Plant Range: Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Virginia Status: Listed as threatened on May 20, 1992 Sensitive joint-vetch gets its name from its leaves, which fold slightly when touched. According to the Five Year Review completed in 2013, only 32 occurrences remain in New Jersey, Maryland, North Carolina, and Virginia, and the species is no longer found in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Sensitive joint-vetch is easily confused with the invasive weed Aeschynomene indica, and sometimes referred to erroneously as an agricultural pest.  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant sample from the Smithsonian collection. Leaves towards the root are broad, while leaves towards the end of the stalks are narrow like rosemarry.
    Information icon Small-anthered bittercress sample from the Smithsonian. Photo by the Smithsonian Institution, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0.

    Small-anthered bittercress

    Small-anthered bittercress is an erect, slender perennial herb with fibrous roots and one (or, rarely, more) simple or branched stem growing two to four decimeters tall.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two cone shaped flowers with pink petals in the foreground with several similar specimens blurred in the background
    Information icon Smooth coneflower at a power-line right of way in Granville County, NC. Photo by Caroline S. Krom, USFWS.

    Smooth Coneflower

    Smooth coneflower is a perennial herb and is a composite, a cluster of flowers grouped together to form a single flower-like structure that will live for more than two years.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.
    Information icon The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn