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Southeastern plants

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the plants the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A small yellow flower with red markings extends from a fern-like plant.
    Information icon Sensitive joint-vetch. Photo by dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Sensitive joint-vetch

    Taxon: Plant Range: Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Virginia Status: Listed as threatened on May 20, 1992 Sensitive joint-vetch gets its name from its leaves, which fold slightly when touched. According to the Five Year Review completed in 2013, only 32 occurrences remain in New Jersey, Maryland, North Carolina, and Virginia, and the species is no longer found in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Sensitive joint-vetch is easily confused with the invasive weed Aeschynomene indica, and sometimes referred to erroneously as an agricultural pest.  Visit the species profile...

  • A plant sample from the Smithsonian collection. Leaves towards the root are broad, while leaves towards the end of the stalks are narrow like rosemarry.
    Information icon Small-anthered bittercress sample from the Smithsonian. Photo by the Smithsonian Institution, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0.

    Small-anthered bittercress

    Small-anthered bittercress is an erect, slender perennial herb with fibrous roots and one (or, rarely, more) simple or branched stem growing two to four decimeters tall.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.
    Information icon Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.
    Information icon The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • Bright pink conical flowers.
    Information icon Flowering swamp pink. Photo by Maja Dumat, CC BY 2.0.

    Swamp pink

    Swamp pink and it’s beautiful conical flower is only found in wetlands along streams and seepage areas in freshwater swamps.  Visit the species profile...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Venus flytrap

    The Venus flytrap, a small perennial herb, is one of the most widely recognized carnivorous plant species on Earth. It occupies distinct longleaf pine habitats in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills of North and South Carolina.  Visit the species profile...

  • White flowers with many stamen burst from a shrub much like a hydrangea bush
    Information icon Virginia spiraea, Walker County, Georgia. Photo © Alan Cressler, used with permission.

    Virginia spiraea

    The Virginia spiraea is found in the Appalachian Plateaus or the southern Blue Ridge Mountains in Alabama, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Georgia.  Visit the species profile...

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