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Southeastern plants

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the plants the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.

    American chaffseed

    American chaffseed is generally found in habitats described as open, moist pine flatwoods, fire-maintained savannas, and flowers from April to June in the South, and from June to mid-July in the North. Visit the species profile...

    American chaffseed © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.

    Bunched arrowhead

    Bunched arrowhead is a small herbaceous plant growing 15-16 inches tall in saturated soils. The white flowers begin blooming in mid-May and continue through July. The fruits mature a few weeks after flowering. Visit the species profile...

    Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • Dozens of green plants in the shape of a pitcher.

    Green pitcher plant

    The carnivorous green pitcher plant has hollow leaves contain liquid and enzymes. When insects fall into the pitchers, they’re digested and the nutrients in the bodies are incorporated into the plant’s tissues. Visit the species profile...

    Clump of green pitcher plants. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant

    The mountain sweet pitcher plant is an insectivorious species is native to bogs and a few streamsides in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North and South Carolina. Visit the species profile...

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A plant sample from the Smithsonian collection. Leaves towards the root are broad, while leaves towards the end of the stalks are narrow like rosemarry.

    Small-anthered bittercress

    Small-anthered bittercress is an erect, slender perennial herb with fibrous roots and one (or, rarely, more) simple or branched stem growing two to four decimeters tall. Visit the species profile...

    Small-anthered bittercress sample from the Smithsonian. Photo by the Smithsonian Institution, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0.

  • A leafy green plant emerging from the leaf-littered forest floor.

    Small-whorled pogonia

    The small-whorled pogonia is a rare orchid listed as threatened on the endangered species list. Visit the species profile...

    Small-whorled pogonia on the forest floor. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A biologist repels down a cliff face to find an endangered plant.

    Spreading avens

    Spreading avens, sometimes called Appalachian avens or cliff avens, is a rare perennial herb endemic to a few scattered mountaintops in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. Visit the species profile...

    The National Park Service’s Matt Cooke measures a spreading avens plant. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

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