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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A spotted black salamander with red tufts around its gills.
    Information icon A young Neuse River waterdog from the Little River, Johnston County, North Carolina. Photo by Jeff Beane.

    Neuse River waterdog

    The Neuse River waterdog is from an ancient lineage of permanently aquatic salamanders in the genus Necturus.  Visit the species profile...

  • Eight northern pintails including two females and six males on a cold, winter lake
    Information icon Northern pintails at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Northern pintail

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Northern pintail typically breed in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States, central Canada, and Alaska. They spend their winters in the southern United States and Mexico, especially along the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Status: Not listed, low concern – More than 2.3 million northern pintail were estimated in the breeding population in 2018. However, substantial declines since the 1950s has resulted in restricted harvest regulations for this species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A duck with bright green head and tail feathers swimming
    Information icon Northern shoveler. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Northern shoveler

    The northern shoveler is a medium-sized dabbling duck, or a duck that feeds by tipping headfirst into shallow water. This species is well-known for its bill, which has a spoon or shovel shape. Because of this unique bill, they have earned the nicknames “spoonbill” and “spoony”. It uses this bill and hundreds of comb-like structures called lamellae to filter tiny zooplankton from the water. Males of this species are brightly colored, with an orange body, white chest, deep green head, and brilliant blue wing patches.  Visit the species profile...

  • A green plant with mint-like leaves and bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Ocmulgee skullcap. Photo © by Alan Cressler, used with permission.

    Ocmulgee skullcap

    Taxon: Plant Range: Georgia, South Carolina Status: Under review First described in 1898, the Ocmulgee skullcap is a rare herbaceous perennial plant found only in the Savannah River (Georgia and South Carolina) and Ocmulgee River (Georgia) watersheds. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was petitioned to list the species in April 2010 and issued a 90-day finding that the petitioned action may be warranted in September 2011. The species is currently under review for possible listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown mussel with orangish brown striations
    Information icon An orangefoot pimpleback mussel. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Orangefoot pimpleback

    The orangefoot pimpleback is a mussel found in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee rivers.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and black mussel with growth striations sitting on a rock.
    Information icon Close-up of endangered mussel from the Ohio River. Photo by Craig Stihler, USFWS.

    Pink mucket

    The Appalachian elktoe has a thin, kidney-shaped shell, extending to about 4 inches. Juveniles generally have a yellowish-brown periostracum (outer shell surface), while the periostracum of the adults is usually dark brown to greenish-black in color.  Visit the species profile...

  • An orange, black and cream colored butterfly perched on a yellow flowering plant
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly. Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly

    One of four species of Atlantea butterflies that inhabit the Greater Antilles, only the Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly occurs in Puerto Rico. With a small population size, no more than 50 butterflies have ever been recorded in a single survey.  Visit the species profile...

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