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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A grey bird with yellow markings over its eye perched on a tall reed on the edge of a marsh
    Information icon MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus macgillivraii), Georgetown County, South Carolina, April 2015; Photo by Yianni Laskaris, Coastal Carolina University.

    Macgillivray’s seaside sparrow

    One of seven remaining seaside sparrow subspecies, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow is known from the coastal marshes of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.  Visit the species profile...

  • A hand holding a small snail hiding in its shell
    Information icon The magnificent ramshorn has a coiled shell in the shape of a rams horn, often reaching the size and weight of a dollar coin. The shell is brown colored (often with leopard-like spots) and fragile. Photo by USFWS.

    Magnificent ramshorn

    Taxon: Gastropod, freshwater snail Range: Lower Cape Fear River Basin, North Carolina Status: Candidate (2011) This snail is an integral part of a complex food web found in freshwater ponds exclusively along coastal North Carolina. This rare snail can no longer be found in the wild places it once inhabited, and is not to be confused with a common relative (the ramshorn snail) found abundantly in pet shops and aquariums.  Visit the species profile...

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with bright purple flowers
    Information icon Male marron bacora flowers. Photo by USFWS.

    Marron bacora

    Marron bacora is a rare, tropical dry forest shrub native to the Virgin Islands. Originally described in 1813 from a specimen collected in the late 1700s, it was presumed to have gone extinct until its rediscovery in 1992.  Visit the species profile...

  • An iridescent insect with many small hairs on its belly standing on leaf litter and sandy soil
    Miami tiger beetle. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    Miami tiger beetle

    The Miami tiger beetle, found exclusively in pine rockland habitat in Miami-Dade County, Florida, has a shiny green exterior and protected under the Endangered Species Act as endangered.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, sand-colored reptile between the cracks of a rock
    Information icon Monito gecko. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, USFWS.

    Monito gecko

    The Monito gecko is the only species of the Sphaerodactylus genus found on Monito Island off the coast of Puerto Rico. It is a tiny reptile, usually measuring an inch and a half (3.5 centimeters) long. It has a gray body, a dark brown tail, and has two dark patches with a white dot on its neck.  Visit the species profile...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant

    The mountain sweet pitcher plant is an insectivorious species is native to bogs and a few streamsides in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North and South Carolina.  Visit the species profile...

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