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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A small, slimy, green salamander in hand.
    Eastern hellbender. Photo by Will Parson, Chesapeake Bay Program, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Eastern hellbender

    This large amphibian can be found crawling around the bottoms of clear, silt-free mountain streams. They are generally nocturnal, spending most of the day under rocks on the stream floor, emerging at night to hunt crayfish.  Visit the species profile...

  • A white breasted bird with blueish grey feathers.
    Elfin-woods warbler. Photo by Mike Morel.

    Elfin-woods warbler

    The elfin-woods warbler was discovered in 1968. In 2016, the elfin-woods warbler was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act with a Section 4(d) rule providing exemptions for certain agriculture and forestry activities that may benefit the species.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brownish yellow mussels the smallest of which has a small white protrusion which the mussel uses to attach to a rock.
    Information icon Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Fanshell

    The fanshell is a green and yellow, medium sized mussel found in various rivers in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background
    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

    Florida panther

    The Florida panther is a subspecies of Puma concolor (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or puma) and represents the only known breeding population of puma in the eastern United States. It is protected as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two splotchy brown birds swimming in a pond
    Information icon A pair of gadwalls. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Gadwall

    Sometimes known affectionately as the “gray duck” by hunters, gadwall are medium-sized dabbling ducks common across temperate areas worldwide. As their nickname indicates, both males and females have gray-brown to gray plumage that is less flashy than many other species. Conservation status Low concern. Related content Nov 12, 2018 | 2 minute read News Hunting season opens with a bang on Merritt Island Refuge Range Gadwall primarily nest in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and Canada and, to a lesser extent, in southern portions of the boreal forest and prairie parklands.  Visit the species profile...

  • Dozens of green plants in the shape of a pitcher.
    Information icon Clump of green pitcher plants. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Green pitcher plant

    The carnivorous green pitcher plant has hollow leaves contain liquid and enzymes. When insects fall into the pitchers, they’re digested and the nutrients in the bodies are incorporated into the plant’s tissues.  Visit the species profile...

  • Shot from above: a small bee that resembles a yellow jacket perched on a yellow flower with a sand beach below.
    Information icon Gulf Coast solitary bee. Photo by Center for Biological Diversity.

    Gulf Coast solitary bee

    The Gulf Coast solitary bee is a rare inhabitant of the sandy barrier islands and landward dunes along the Gulf of Mexico extending from Horn Island, Mississippi eastward to St. Andrew’s Bay in northwest Florida.  Visit the species profile...

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