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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Cumberland darter

    The Cumberland darter is a small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings found in 14 streams in Kentucky and Tennessee. It is protected as an endangered species and is threatened primarily by water pollution.  Visit the species profile...

  • An illustration of two cutthroat trout underwater in a rocky environment.
    Information icon Cutthroat trout illustration by Timothy Knepp, USFWS.

    Cutthroat trout

    Taxon: Freshwater fish Range: Cutthroat trout are native to the Western United States; introduced in the Southeast. Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act, but several subspecies are considered threatened in their native ranges. Cutthroat trout are freshwater fish in the family Salmonidae, as are rainbow trout. Although inhabiting clear, cold streams in their native range in western North America, this species is becoming a popular sport fish stocked below federal water projects in the Southeast.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, slimy, green salamander in hand.
    Eastern hellbender. Photo by Will Parson, Chesapeake Bay Program, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Eastern hellbender

    This large amphibian can be found crawling around the bottoms of clear, silt-free mountain streams. They are generally nocturnal, spending most of the day under rocks on the stream floor, emerging at night to hunt crayfish.  Visit the species profile...

  • A white breasted bird with blueish grey feathers.
    Elfin-woods warbler. Photo by Mike Morel.

    Elfin-woods warbler

    The elfin-woods warbler was discovered in 1968. In 2016, the elfin-woods warbler was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act with a Section 4(d) rule providing exemptions for certain agriculture and forestry activities that may benefit the species.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brownish yellow mussels the smallest of which has a small white protrusion which the mussel uses to attach to a rock.
    Information icon Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Fanshell

    The fanshell is a green and yellow, medium sized mussel found in various rivers in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background
    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

    Florida panther

    The Florida panther is a subspecies of Puma concolor (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or puma) and represents the only known breeding population of puma in the eastern United States. It is protected as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.  Visit the species profile...

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