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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • Brown trout

    Taxon: Freshwater fish Range: Native to Europe; introduced to North America in 1883. Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Brown trout are a coldwater species like most fish of the salmon family. The first brown trout eggs were imported to the U.S. from Germany in 1883. In 1884, the release of 4,900 brown-trout fry into Michigan’s Baldwin River represented the first time the species swam free in U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bunched arrowhead

    Bunched arrowhead is a small herbaceous plant growing 15-16 inches tall in saturated soils. The white flowers begin blooming in mid-May and continue through July. The fruits mature a few weeks after flowering.  Visit the species profile...

  • A rust colored bird preening in the water.
    Information icon Canvasback. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Canvasback

    Canvasback is the largest species of diving duck in North America and is highly recognizable due to the male’s stark white body, contrasting with a deep maroon head and neck. This species has been nicknamed “bull-neck,” and referred to as the aristocrat of ducks. Because of its diving feeding style, it spends most of its time using moderately deep-water marshes and lakes where it roots in the sediment searching for its favorite food, plant tubers from submersed aquatic vegetation.  Visit the species profile...

  • About a dozen small fish in a container ready for release
    Information icon Cape Fear shiners. Photo by NCWRC.

    Cape Fear shiner

    The Cape Fear shiner is a freshwater fish in the minnow family found in the central part of North Carolina, in the Upper Cape Fear River Basin.  Visit the species profile...

  • A dark colored mussel embedded in a stream bed, open filtering water.
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.

    Carolina heelsplitter

    Taxon: Mussel Range: North Carolina, South Carolina Status: Listed as endangered on June 30, 1993 Related content Feb 5, 2020 | 5 minute read Articles A good year at the hatcheries Oct 28, 2019 | 2 minute read Articles Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem Sep 28, 2018 | 2 minute read Articles Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter Mar 9, 2018 | 3 minute read News Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species Oct 13, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter Jun 12, 2017 | 7 minute read Articles Musseling back from near extinction Jun 6, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read News 2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions Jun 2, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center Aug 4, 2010 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolina’s conservation aquaculture center Wildlife Carolina heelsplitter Appearance The Carolina heelsplitter freshwater mussel was first described in 1852.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small catfish swimming above rocky substrate.
    Carolina madtom. Photo by D Biggins, former USFWS.

    Carolina madtom

    The Carolina madtom is a small catfish, reaching a maximum length of nearly five inches and can be found in riffles, runs, and pools in medium to large streams and rivers. Ideally, it inhabits fresh waters with continuous, year-round flow and moderate gradient in both the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic regions.  Visit the species profile...

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