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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • About a dozen small fish in a container ready for release
    Information icon Cape Fear shiners. Photo by NCWRC.

    Cape Fear shiner

    The Cape Fear shiner is a freshwater fish in the minnow family found in the central part of North Carolina, in the Upper Cape Fear River Basin.  Visit the species profile...

  • A dark colored mussel embedded in a stream bed, open filtering water.
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.

    Carolina heelsplitter

    Taxon: Mussel Range: North Carolina, South Carolina Status: Listed as endangered on June 30, 1993 Related content Feb 5, 2020 | 5 minute read Articles A good year at the hatcheries Oct 28, 2019 | 2 minute read Articles Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem Sep 28, 2018 | 2 minute read Articles Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter Mar 9, 2018 | 3 minute read News Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species Oct 13, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter Jun 12, 2017 | 7 minute read Articles Musseling back from near extinction Jun 6, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read News 2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions Jun 2, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center Aug 4, 2010 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolina‚Äôs conservation aquaculture center Wildlife Carolina heelsplitter Appearance The Carolina heelsplitter freshwater mussel was first described in 1852.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small catfish swimming above rocky substrate.
    Carolina madtom. Photo by D Biggins, former USFWS.

    Carolina madtom

    The Carolina madtom is a small catfish, reaching a maximum length of nearly five inches and can be found in riffles, runs, and pools in medium to large streams and rivers. Ideally, it inhabits fresh waters with continuous, year-round flow and moderate gradient in both the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic regions.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a small squirrel with yellow gloves
    Information icon A Carolina northern flying squirrel in the hands of a biologist. Photo by Sue Cameron, USFWS.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    The Carolina northern flying squirrel is an American endangered species found in North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee. It is typically found at high elevations in mixed red spruce-northern hardwood and spruce-fir forests.  Visit the species profile...

  • Carolina pygmy sunfish

    The Carolina pygmy sunfish is a member of the family Elassomatidae, a family of small secretive fish containing six known species found only in the southeastern United States.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black mussel with brownish yellow striations extends a small white appendage from its shell
    Information icon Cumberland bean juveniles reared at the Center for Mollusk Conservation in Frankfort, Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Cumberland bean

    The Cumberland bean is a small mussel found in Alabama, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species and can be found in river systems within the Cumberland River and Tennessee River drainages.  Visit the species profile...

  • A mussel sitting on rocky substrate with rays like growth rings on a tree and dark vertical stiping.
    Information icon Cumberland combshell. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Cumberland combshell

    The Cumberlandian combshell has a thick solid shell with a smooth to clothlike periostracum (thin, skin-like coating), which is yellow to tawny brown in color with narrow green broken rays.  Visit the species profile...

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