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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.
    Information icon Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com, used with permission.

    Black-capped petrel

    Taxon: Bird Range: Breeds on Hispaniola within the countries of Dominican Republic and Haiti; forages offshore in waters of the Atlantic off the coast of northern South America through North America as far north as Maine, occasionally further into Canada Status: Proposed for listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act The black-capped petrel is a seabird found in North America and the Caribbean, and is known by several common names: “black-capped petrel,” “capped petrel,” and “West Indian petrel” in North America and on English-speaking islands.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.
    Information icon Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

    Blackfin sucker

    A small fish averaging about five and a half inches in length, the blackfin sucker has a body patterned with two dark, brownish-black horizontal lines below the lateral line (a faint line of sense organs extending from the gill cover to the tail) and six or seven additional lines in the back and the side of the body, with intervening olive-gold stripes.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with yellow flowers like a dandilion emerge from a rock crevace.
    Information icon Blue Ridge goldenrod. Photo © Gregory Wilson.

    Blue Ridge goldenrod

    Blue Ridge goldenrod is a rare perennial herb with yellow flowers endemic to a limited area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bog turtle (southern population)

    The bog turtle is the smallest turtle in North America. It’s orange to yellow patch on either side of the neck easily distinguishes it from other turtles.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • Brown trout

    Taxon: Freshwater fish Range: Native to Europe; introduced to North America in 1883. Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Brown trout are a coldwater species like most fish of the salmon family. The first brown trout eggs were imported to the U.S. from Germany in 1883. In 1884, the release of 4,900 brown-trout fry into Michigan’s Baldwin River represented the first time the species swam free in U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.
    Information icon Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bunched arrowhead

    Bunched arrowhead is a small herbaceous plant growing 15-16 inches tall in saturated soils. The white flowers begin blooming in mid-May and continue through July. The fruits mature a few weeks after flowering.  Visit the species profile...

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