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Southeastern wildlife

The species profiles below are a one-stop-shop for information about the the Service's Southeast region is responsible for protecting and/or recovering.

  • A light purple salamander with dark spots and tufts above its front legs.
    Information icon Black Warrior waterdog. Photo by Joseph Jenkins, Alabama Natural Heritage Program.

    Black Warrior waterdog

    The Black Warrior waterdog is a large, aquatic, nocturnal salamander that permanently retains a larval form and external gills throughout its life. This species has been proposed for listing as Endangered and is only found in streams within the Black Warrior River Basin in Alabama.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and grey duck with a black belly standing at the entrance to a large birdhouse
    Information icon Black-bellied whistling duck. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Black-bellied whistling duck

    The black-bellied whistling duck is sometimes described as part goose and part duck because of its rather peculiar physical features and behaviors. Like many goose species, black-bellied whistling ducks graze on grasses in upland areas, but they also nest in tree cavities similar to wood ducks. This species is highly gregarious, adaptable to using urban areas, and highly recognizable due to its pink bill and legs. Conservation Status Low concern.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.
    Information icon Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com, used with permission.

    Black-capped petrel

    Taxon: Bird Range: Breeds on Hispaniola within the countries of Dominican Republic and Haiti; forages offshore in waters of the Atlantic off the coast of northern South America through North America as far north as Maine, occasionally further into Canada Status: Proposed for listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act The black-capped petrel is a seabird found in North America and the Caribbean, and is known by several common names: “black-capped petrel,” “capped petrel,” and “West Indian petrel” in North America and on English-speaking islands.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.
    Information icon Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

    Blackfin sucker

    A small fish averaging about five and a half inches in length, the blackfin sucker has a body patterned with two dark, brownish-black horizontal lines below the lateral line (a faint line of sense organs extending from the gill cover to the tail) and six or seven additional lines in the back and the side of the body, with intervening olive-gold stripes.  Visit the species profile...

  • A leafy green plant with yellow flowers like a dandilion emerge from a rock crevace.
    Information icon Blue Ridge goldenrod. Photo © Gregory Wilson.

    Blue Ridge goldenrod

    Blue Ridge goldenrod is a rare perennial herb with yellow flowers endemic to a limited area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brown birds with white spots on the edge of their wings standing in water
    Information icon Blue-winged teals. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Blue-winged teal

    Blue-winged teal are the second smallest duck in North America and are highly distinctive during flight due to their bright blue wing patch. Populations are highly responsive to wetland conditions in their breeding range; those years with many small temporary wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region typically produce large hatches of this species. Conservation status Low concern. Related content Jul 14, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts Duck populations Range These long-distance migrants breed as far north as Alaska and throughout Canada, primarily nesting in the prairies of the central U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bog turtle (southern population)

    The bog turtle is the smallest turtle in North America. It’s orange to yellow patch on either side of the neck easily distinguishes it from other turtles.  Visit the species profile...

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